Archive for December, 2014

Top Ten In 2014……

Monday, December 29th, 2014

The results are in!

Our top 10 blog posts in 2014 were:

1.   Adaptive Strategy – A Way To Profits In The New Normal? looks at an alternative strategy that is built on the 3 R’s (Responsiveness, Resilience, Readiness) required in a changing environment.

2.   6 Ways A Business Owner Can Influence Culture looks at the ways a business owner can develop a culture which will help increase operating profits and build shareholder value.

3.   6 Challenges Fast Growing Companies Face discusses the 6 challenges of execution which, if not dealt with, could prove fatal.

4.   3 Times When You May Need To Change Your Strategy explains when a company should review its strategy and what makes that review and any subsequent actions necessary.

5.   The Difference Between A Strategy And A Plan talks about the difference between strategy and planning and why it’s important to understand what these terms mean.

6.   6 Things We Can All Learn From Family-Owned Business puts forward 6 simple things business owners can implement to achieve better long-term financial performances.

7.  Use These 3 Tips To Make Your Next Critical Decision offers 3 things Ram Charan, co-author of “Execution”, says business leaders do when faced with a critical decision.

8.  5 Traits Effective Business Owners Share outlines some of the traits effective entrepreneurs have in common that contribute to the growth of their businesses.

9.  3 Reasons Why Consulting Assignments Fail and 3 Reasons Why Consulting Assignments Fail – Part 2 addresses the most common reasons why things can go wrong between consultants and their clients.

10. Strategic Planning – 3 Things That Are Wrong With It outlines how business owners make 3 mistakes that could destroy their company when they confuse strategy and strategic planning.

If you missed any of them, here’s another opportunity!


Santa Claus and VUCA

Monday, December 15th, 2014

The Holiday season set me thinking.VUCA and its impact on strategy

One of the traditions in our version of the Holidays is the letter/email from each child to Santa Claus, the determination if the child has been naughty or nice and, assuming the latter, the resulting delivery of gifts on Christmas morning.

To execute successfully, Santa manufactures or purchases the gifts then packages and delivers them.

These operations take place in his workshop and distribution centre, located at the North Pole and staffed by elves.

This much we know for fact.

This year, however, there’s a question around Santa’s strategy which is of fundamental interest to all strategy consultants.

What is the impact, if any, of VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity)?

Academics and key figures in the consulting world appear to agree that VUCA exists. But that’s about it.

Because, while some say it has made strategy and strategic planning redundant, others argue it has no impact whatsoever on the need for an organization to develop and execute a coherent strategy.

It’s important at this point to determine Santa’s KPI’s.

The 2 critical performance factors are accuracy (the right kid gets the right toy) and on time delivery (the toys are delivered during the night on Christmas Eve). Quality is irrelevant because kids spend more time playing with the wrapping than with the presents.

It’s assumed that Santa has availed himself (I’m assigning a male orientation to the incumbent. A discussion of the suitability of other genders for the role is a topic for a future post) of all modern processes and technologies.

Lean manufacturing; warehouse management systems; mobile computing; performance-based compensation for elves; and video monitoring of child behavior, with NSA input on social media patterns; the use of ‘big data’ etc., etc., are all givens.

And Santa’s strategy is tried and tested over many years.

So the only variable is VUCA.

The only way we can be sure of the outcome is to wait until Christmas morning and conduct rapid research by monitoring social media trends and conducting structured telephone interviews with a representative sample of the population.

Now, I am not given to making predictions.

But, given the season, I am going to break this habit. I predict that Santa’s performance this year will be at least on a par with previous years.

Which means that VUCA will have had as little impact on his need for a strategy as it has on the needs of every other organization.

Happy Holidays!


If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy 3 Techniques For Removing Bias From The Big Decisions

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Be Known For The Things You Do – And For Those You Don’t

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

In last week’s post I spoke about one of the reasons I started ProfitPATH 12 years ago.let your business be known for the things you do - and for those you don't

I wanted to create a company that did things differently to the way in which management consultants traditionally behaved.

To act as a guide, I made a list of all the things consultants I’d hired over the years had done that had annoyed me – and said we’ll do the opposite.

While I’ve often spoken about the list, I’ve never actually publicized it.

Now I’ve decided to change that. As a start, I thought we’d replace some of the outdated content on our current web site with the list.

I had to dig through some really old files but I found the original piece of paper on which I’d written the list.

Here it is.

We exist to help business owners achieve the results they want for their companies.  To do that we will:

1.   Tell clients when:

•  We don’t know how to do what they need. We will focus on what we do best.
•  They can do something by themselves. We will not bill clients for unnecessary work.
•  We don’t understand their requirements – even if it makes us look silly. We will not risk missing their expectations.
•  They ask us to provide “silver bullet” solutions. The Lone Ranger may have those – but we don’t.
•  We can’t provide what they need at the price or to meet the schedule they want. We will not “agree now, modify later”.

2.  Adapt and use tools and processes that we know deliver results. We will not use clients as guinea pigs.

3.  Design our services so that we can see the results of our work. We will not write reports and walk away.

4.  Find ways to link our compensation to the results of our work. This will be hard but we will not give up.

5.  Allow clients to terminate a project at any time – without a financial penalty.

6.  Always offer references. Where possible from clients of a similar size, in a similar industry.

7.  Submit proposals which contain absolutely no surprises – because they include only things we’ve already discussed with the client.

After seeing the list again I’m proud of how we’ve run the business.

However, I’m wondering what, if anything I missed.

What do you think?


If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy The Elusive ‘Silver Bullet’

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

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