Archive for March, 2015

3 Strategies – Good, Fast or Cheap

Tuesday, March 31st, 2015

When I first saw this picture a couple of weeks ago, I had a really good chuckle.Good, fast or cheap - which strategy will you choose to grow your business?

Then I realized – it illustrated the key aspects of both strategy development and execution far more effectively than all of the books and articles ever written.

You’re a business owner, the company’s done well, but you know there’s room to grow and you know where you want your company to be in 3 years’ time.

To get there, you will have to do a number of things.

One of the most important is you’ll have to make choices.

You can be a low-cost provider, the cheapest supplier in town, low margins offset by high turnover.

To prevent those skinny margins disappearing, you will have to keep 2 things low:

•  The cost of making or buying your product or service. That will affect quality.
•  Your overhead – which means you won’t be offering the best delivery or support around.

So being cheap is OK but your service won’t be perceived as good or fast and you’ll be continually fighting to protect, or expand, your market share on price alone.

OR

You can differentiate your products/services by providing good quality, fast service or both. Lower turnover is offset by greatly improved margins.

•  Your cost of making, or developing, your product or service will be higher because you’ll use the best materials and skilled labour.
•  Your overhead will be higher too. Fast delivery requires competent people and good infrastructure; maintaining a reputation for quality requires research and development and innovation.

So you can be good, fast, or both but you’ll be well up the price range. Perhaps even in the wonderful world of premium pricing.

But you won’t be cheap.

OR

You can focus on a specific market, segment of a market, or niche and build the reputation for specialized knowledge and expertise.

In this case, you shouldn’t have to be cheap since your expertise should create the perception that you’re good.

If you’re really good, you can, to at least some extent, choose how fast you want to be. Why? – Because people will wait for the best specialist to fix their problem.

To wrap up, let me return to the point I made about the picture earlier – it’s taken me almost 300 words to say what it said in 26! And I’m sure I haven’t made you laugh once.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Want Your Company To Grow? Here Are 3 Words To Live By

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

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Get Results From Your Strategy Offsites

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

Holding a strategy offsite is like going to the dentist.Get results from strategy offsites with these tips

Doing it regularly should prevent unexpected pain and discomfort.

But going to the dentist is something that can be avoided. Why do it when everything’s going well, when it’s not necessary?

After all, a visit to the dentist can result in discomfort or even end badly.

It’s the same thing with a planning meeting.

It’s uncomfortable when, for example, people don’t want to get behind the business owner’s ‘stretch’ goals. And most people can look back on an offsite they attended and wonder why they bothered – because nothing changed.

So here are some things we’ve learned to ensure strategy offsites deliver results.

1.    Before the meeting

Set a realistic goal.

I ask clients to imagine we’re packing up after the last day of the offsite, and they’re feeling really good about what has been achieved.

Then I ask them what has to have happened for them to be feeling that way.

Sometimes, after they reply, we have to use our experience to illustrate what can, and can’t, be achieved in 1 or 2 days.

Distribute pre-work before the strategy offsite to maximize productivity in the time spent face-to-face. Any thinking that can be done in advance should be and any information required to make decisions should be distributed and studied.

2.    During the offsite

Keep people focused by:

• Announcing times for coffee and lunch breaks and insisting email and calls are dealt with then.

• Using a  ‘parking lot’ to record topics that are important, but not immediately relevant. Clear it at the end of each day.

Relieve the intensity of the discussions by using brainteasers and humorous video clips. Vary the pace, and make sure everyone’s thoughts are heard, by using sub-groups for some sessions.

Our process ends with the development of specific, measurable, time-related action plans to solve the problem that was the focus of the offsite.  Appoint Champions to coordinate the completion of the Plans.

This way everyone leaves with a sense of accomplishment and a clear plan of action.

3.    After the meeting

Capitalize on the momentum by holding regular, structured follow-up meetings.

Get everyone together at least once a quarter. Each Champion gives a progress report on his or her Action Plan and adjustments are made if necessary.

Take these tips and you’ll get results from your strategy offsites.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy What’s The Best Strategy – Grow The Core Or Expand?

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Purpose, People, Profits

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015

 

This week’s guest is Mark Lukens, a Founding Partner of Method3, a global management consulting firm, and Tack3, a business and non-profit consultancy. He has 20 plus years of C-Level experience across multiple sectors including healthcare, education, government, and people and potential (aka HR). Most of Mark’s writing involves theoretical considerations and practical applications, academics, change leadership, and other topics at the intersection of business, society, and humanity.

 

In the 1980s we were told that profit was king. The whole economy was restructured to put this focus before all else, on the basis that if we did that right then everything else would follow. But the reality is very different. Profit itself follows from putting a sense of wider purpose first, and from looking after people in the way that such a purpose ensures.

Purpose

To put profit first is to let someone else set our direction. It is to act as if we have no choice, when what we are really doing is choosing the easiest path, the one that makes us least distinctive.

But taking the immediate easiest path is never taking the most beneficial path in the long term, because so many others are following the same path, all fighting for scraps of the same short-term benefits. This creates situations like the current housing market, which creates financial bubbles rather than new housing for those who most need it, even though a different path could solve the shortage in less than a generation.

If you want to create something that stands out, something that endures, then first you have to choose your path, not let the market choose it for you, whether that purpose is social housing, radical design or an alternative approach to cloud solutions. Start with what you want to achieve.

People

An organization with a sense of purpose will naturally end up serving the people who share that sense of purpose, as innovations to assist that cause also assist them.

Improvements to the battery life of the Tesla Roadster provide an example of this. The company wants to provide more efficient environmentally friendly ways to drive, and their customers want the same thing. As they achieve improvements to this technology, like a battery that can go further between charges, they come closer to their aim of better environmentally friendly cars, while also providing a better service to the people driving those cars. Over time, this will increase the number of people using their products, through better service and value for money.

Tesla Motors are no mere novelty. They are a company on the rise, financially and in terms of profile. That rise comes from serving a purpose, and so serving people.

Profits

Across the globe, there are signs that a sense of purpose can lead companies to profit by better serving people.

Like Tesla Motors or Woetzel, Mischke and Ram’s schemes for a better housing market, the Fairtrade movement finds it purpose in a grand cause, aiming to provide a better income for poor third world producers. This directly puts people first, and has led to profit for organizations large and small, from African mango growers to London boutique shops.

But a purpose doesn’t need to be political or social to benefit a company. Apple’s sense of purpose has long been built around providing technological innovation and user-friendly products. This has provided customers with products they never knew that they wanted but now can’t live without, such as the iPhone, and a design aesthetic that has a huge cult-like following. Their strong sense of purpose has provided for people, and ultimately for huge profits.

PPP

Putting purpose first is about recognizing that profit is not an end in itself, but a way of supporting companies and those who invest in them. If your purpose is something that people value then those people will naturally be served by your work, and profit will flow from that.

It’s not about ignoring profit. It’s about putting purpose first.

You can reach Mark at marklukens@gmail.com or visit his website at http://www.marklukens.com

Your Company, Your House

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015

I heard a wonderful metaphor a couple of weeks ago.To grow your business, think of your company as a house

Think of your company as a house.

The functional areas or departments – for example sales, marketing, operations, HR and finance – each represent a room in the house.

You can’t have a house without rooms and rooms have no purpose on their own. A house is not a home if it’s just a bunch of rooms.

The construction materials with which your house is built are, for example, peoples’ skills and experience; processes that enable the areas to function effectively; IT systems that provide data to manage performance.

Your culture is the mortar holding your house together.

What happens when we decide we want to grow? After all, as business owners, our main – if not sole – focus is on growth.

Growth can be achieved in 2 ways. By making one or more rooms in your existing house larger or by designing and building a bigger house.

1.  Making one or more rooms bigger

You can do this by, for example, adding more sales people to bring in more orders, or by launching a marketing campaign to generate more leads.

But making one room in a house bigger puts pressure on the other rooms. That has consequences. If you don’t believe me, try making one of your children’s bedrooms larger while making another one’s smaller.

As one room or area grows, everything else is forced out of proportion. You may even put pressure on the structure of the house and cracks will appear as the bricks and mortar strain to hold everything together.

A couple of examples of the business equivalent are tight cash flow, an increasing backlog of orders or losing good people.

2.  Designing and building a bigger house

Design and build a larger house and you grow, while structurally keeping everything in proportion.

How does this apply to your Company?

Designing and building a bigger house is equivalent to developing and executing a business strategy.

Each of the functions, or rooms, still has its own strategy. But they work in the context of, and by supporting, the strategy for the entire house/business.

If you involve your team in the design, the end product will be better and they’ll be more committed to getting it built.

I like this metaphor. What do you think?

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Sustainable Growth – How To Achieve It

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

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