Can Strategic Planning Pay Off?

“The most fundamental weakness of most corporate plans today is that they do not lead to the major decisions that must be made currently to ensure the success of the enterprise in the future.”Key factors to make strategic planning pay off

It sounds like something I might have written in one of my blog posts because the point applies equally to owner-managed businesses.

But, regrettably, it wasn’t.

It’s from an article written by a 31-year-old, who then goes on to say:

“…..Nothing really new happens as a result of the plan, except that everyone gets a warm glow of security and satisfaction now that the uncertainty of the future has been contained……”

Does that sound familiar? The author goes on to say:

“……too many managements fail to…….recognize that the end product of strategic analysis should not be plans but current decisions.”

He then lists the reasons why decisions aren’t made:

• It’s risky – a bad decision could jeopardize the company.

• It’s difficult – “Strategic planning….deals with the most complex questions facing a company……synthesizing critical issues and strategic options to resolve those issues….is fundamentally a creative process. Many…..find it an elusive, uncomfortable task.”

• It requires leadership – making controversial decisions requires a willingness to be tough-minded.

• The value system works against it – owners often emphasize short-term results, which have little to do with long-term strategic success.

Next the author points out that “Many planning systems simply….produce forecasts of financial results, or statements of objectives”.

This is “….momentum” planning as opposed to dynamic planning that is attuned to the realities of external change……..

To deal with this, emphasis must be given to 3 things – evaluating the external environment; thorough evaluation of competitive strategies; and developing contingency plans.

Finally, the author provides 2 recommendations for motivating the people who can make or break a strategy. Involve those who will actually have to execute the strategy and adapt reward systems to recognize longer-term performance and the achievement of strategic goals.

So, which of today’s leading thinkers wrote the article? None of them did.

An up-and-coming member of the McKinsey team called Lou Gerstner (of IBM fame) wrote the article in 1973.

I like the article because it addresses all 4 of the Risks we believe growing companies face – having a Clear Growth Plan; linking it to Action; getting Buy In and holding people Accountable.

You can find the full article here.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Strategic Planning – 3 Things That Are Wrong With It

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

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Tags: accountability, action, decision-making, execution, growth plan, Jim Stewart, Leadership, People, Planning, ProfitPATH, results, risks, strategic planning, strategy, success

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