Do You Know What You Don’t Know?

It’s really important to know what you don’t know.

But it’s even more important to be able to admit it to yourself.

When I started my company almost 10 years ago I made a list of everything the consultants I’d hired in my previous life had done which annoyed me.

ProfitPATH’s values statement is to do the opposite of everything that is on that list.

Something that really annoyed me was….

….having a consultant tell me that they could do something when they knew there was someone else out there who could do it better.

It meant that I paid them to learn, or perfect, a new skill or technique. Then they inflicted a sub-standard (compared to the more knowledgeable or experienced third party) performance on my company.

In the best case they wasted time, slowing me down while they got up to speed. Meaning it took me longer to achieve the results for which I was accountable.

In the worst case they didn’t master the topic or process well and that adversely affected our performance.

I felt so strongly about this type of behaviour that it was near the top of my “hate” list.

Not doing it became one of our primary values. One, I know, that has cost us revenue over the years. But I’m comfortable with that – we didn’t get into consulting for the short term and we’re not in it for the short term now.

But what happens when…

….a business owner, a potential client, knows what they don’t know – but won’t admit it to themselves or anyone else?

One of the things I’ve learned, now that we’re the consultants, is that this situation does arise – in companies of all sizes.

In my experience there are 2 possible outcomes.

The first is that the owner will go ahead and make decisions or take the company into areas that they’re not equipped to deal with. And, sooner or later, they will make a mistake.

How wide ranging the impact will be depends on a number of factors.
In the best case it might mean a minor setback. In the worst case it could seriously affect the company’s ability to operate and the livelihood of the employees.

The second possible outcome is that, rather than seek out or listen to advice, the owner will do nothing. It could be argued that this is the better alternative.

However, it’s not, it’s also a mistake. It means avoiding decisions, or putting a halt to initiatives, which could have benefited the company and the employees. And doing it knowing there are people out there who have the skill, knowledge and experience required to be successful.

If the owner continues to take this approach she or he could be the factor that limits the growth of their own company.

The moral of the tale is…..

My Mum used to say that 2 wrongs don’t make a right.

Here we have 2 different parties – consultant and business owners – doing the same thing wrong.

The result, the outcome will be the same. And it won’t be the best one for the company.

That’s just not right.

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Tags: advice, business, client, company, consultant, consulting, decisions, employees, Jim Stewart, knowledge, owner, performance, ProfitPATH, results, skill, values statement

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