Is Innovation Part of Your Growth Strategy?

My friend Lisa Taylor is the founder of Challenge Factory, which offers unique career services for individuals and talent programs for companies.Innovation as a growth strategy for Canadian business owners

She, quite accurately in my opinion, describes her company as Canada’s innovation leader in career and talent management.

So it seemed only appropriate that Lisa would see, and forward, an article about a survey on firm-level innovation in Canada¹.

The results contain some interesting lessons about innovation as a growth strategy for Canadian business owners.

1.  The most successful innovation strategy is to provide products and services to new international markets. According to the survey, firms that do this earn between 10 and 30 per cent more net income than their counterparts using other approaches.

Yet more than 85% of Canadian firms prefer to operate within provincial or national borders, or in North America, rather than competing in international markets.

Perhaps this is a result of our conservative nature.

2.  More than half of the Canadian firms surveyed pursue a “user needs-driven” innovation strategy. This means they get new ideas for developing products and services from customers.

In comparison, about one-third of the respondents adopted a technology-driven innovation strategy – one that relies on exploiting advances in technology to gain a competitive edge.

The user-needs approach is probably less risky and may produce faster returns than the technology-driven.

3.  The most common challenges which slow down or prevent innovation include – fear of risk, lack of funding, lack of leadership focus and the organization’s culture.

The fear of risk and lack of focus make perfect sense as challenges to innovation and reflect what we see in our own practice. You can argue that, since a company’s leadership directly influences the culture, those 2 are related also.

4.  Internal cash is the number one source of funding for innovation in Canadian firms. Government financing comes second, ahead of private equity and bank financing.

And firms looking to expand the size of their markets/territory make more use of internal financing and less use of government funding or private equity than do firms with user- or technology-driven innovation strategies.

It’s not clear if the use of internal cash is by choice or by constraint. Either way, it’s interesting that neither private equity nor government financing is more readily available for market expansion, given the fact that the companies doing this achieve better average financial performance than other firms do.

5.  There is a strong correlation between the intensity of innovation efforts and company performance – but only if the innovation activities are well managed.

This should not be a surprise to anyone who follows my blog because it’s confirmation of a point I make often. If company A executes its strategy more effectively than company B, then company A will obtain the best results, even if company B has the better strategy.

You can read the article Lisa sent me here.

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¹  2012 Survey Findings: The State of Firm-Level Innovation in Canada, published by The Conference Board of Canada’s Centre for Business Innovation.

 

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Tags: business owners, Challenge Factory, Culture, customers, execution, expansion, financing, funding, growth strategy, innovation, international markets, Jim Stewart, Leadership, ProfitPATH, strategy, survey

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