Strategic Planning – 3 Things That Are Wrong With It

We all know that picking a strategy means making choices.3 things wrong with strategic planning

But that means making guesses about that great unknown, the future. What happens then if we make the wrong choice? Could we destroy a company?

That’s why, according to Roger Martin¹, we turn choosing a strategy into a problem that can be solved using tools we are comfortable with.

And we call that strategic planning.

But, Martin says, companies make 3 mistakes when they confuse strategy and strategic planning.

1.  Putting the cart before the horse:

All strategic plans have 3 parts:

•  A vision or mission statement,
•  A list of initiatives required to achieve it,
•  The results of those initiatives expressed as financial statements.

These financials typically project 3 – 5 years into the future, making them “strategic” (although management typically focuses on only the first year’s numbers).

But the dominant logic in these plans, says Martin, is affordability; the plan consists of whichever initiatives fit the company’s resources. And that’s putting the cart before the horse.

2.  Relying on cost-based thinking:

The company is in control of its costs – it can, for example, decide how much office space it needs and how to promote its products.

And costs are known, or can be calculated, so fit easily into planning.

This thinking is extended to revenue forecasting and companies build detailed, internal forecasts by, for example, salesperson or product.

But these projections gloss over the fact that customers control revenue and that they decide how much a company gets.

3.  Basing strategy on what the company can control:

A number of well-known models are used for strategic planning. But they can be misused. Take Mintzberg’s concept of emergent strategy.

Martin believes it was intended to make business owners comfortable making adjustments to their deliberate strategy in response to changes emerging in the environment.

However, because waiting, and following what others are doing, is much safer than making hard choices and taking risks, emergent strategy has been hijacked to justify not making any strategic choices in the face of unpredictability.

But following competitors’ choices will never produce a unique or valuable advantage.

What do I think?

I like Martin’s views but the crux still lies in linking planning to execution, turning desire into results.

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“The Big Lie of Strategic Planning”, Harvard Business Review, January 2014,
http://hbr.org/2014/01/the-big-lie-of-strategic-planning/ar/pr

 

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

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Tags: business owners, changes, costs, execution, financial statements, Forecasting, goals, initiatives, Jim Stewart, mission, ProfitPATH, resources, results, revenue, strategic planning, strategy, vision

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