Strategies That Get Results Are Developed By Thinkers And Doers

The companies we work with are less complex organizations than those in the Fortune 500.Include strategy developers in the execution process for better results

But our clients can experience the same types of problems that the big guys face.

Here’s an example.

A gap between the thinkers and the doers

I read this week about the gap that exists in large corporations because the people who develop strategy aren’t the ones who have to execute it.

In most of the companies we work with, a gap like this shouldn’t exist. However, it does occur in some.

In this case the gap is not caused by the separation of responsibility for developing and executing strategy. It’s caused by a strategy development process that isn’t sufficiently inclusive.

In our clients, the business owner is responsible for both developing strategy and ensuring that it’s executed.

Arguably, everyone else is responsible only for execution. And their responsibility is very often limited to only the parts of the strategy that directly affect them.

The owner can:

a)  develop the strategy by him or herself, or

b)  involve her/his management team, or

c)  involve the management team and key players from all parts of the company.

In the companies we work with, the gap occurs when the owner opts only for alternative a) or b).

Disadvantages of having a gap

There are several disadvantages of excluding key players.

•  They are the people who have been intimately involved in executing all of the strategies that have been developed in their past, either with their current employer or in other companies. As a result, they know what is involved in making a strategy work, in getting results. They can provide valuable input at the development stage, even nipping impractical strategies in the bud before time and resources are wasted on them.

•  If the key players understand the reasoning and logic behind a strategy it will help them make the right decisions and best choices when circumstances change (as always they do) during implementation.

•  People are more committed to a course of action when they’ve had a part in developing it. So the key players are more likely to keep persisting in the face of difficulty.

An example of how to prevent the gap

One of our clients had a workforce of 300 unionized employees, spread across the Province. When it came time to renew the strategy, the General Manager invited 10% of the workforce to participate in the process.

The representatives, chosen by their teammates, were expected to represent their areas in the sessions and to provide feedback when they went back to work units.

The quality of the input the representatives brought with them and the value they added to the discussion and debate was quite remarkable.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy 5 Reasons Why I Love Execution

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Tags: business owners, decision-making, implementation, Jim Stewart, management, People, Planning, Process, ProfitPATH, results, strategy, Strategy Development, Strategy Execution

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