Posts Tagged ‘acquisitions’

ProfitPATH’s Top Ten Blogs – First Half 2014

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

 

1.   6 Challenges Fast Growing Companies Face

I’ve mentioned Inc. magazine www.inc.com several times before. It’s a great resource. There’s a well-researched article in the current issue about 6 challenges fast growing companies face. They’re all about execution – and if the owner doesn’t deal with them well any one of them can be fatal. more

 

 

Strategy is not planning and the importance of knowing the difference2.   The Difference Between A Strategy And A Plan

I want to talk briefly about what I think is one of the worst mistakes – confusing strategy and planning. Roger Martin wrote a post for the HBR last month in which he dealt with this very topic. I frequently hear business owners talk about the need to do “strategic planning” in order to create a “strategic plan”. Some talk – every year – about holding a “strategic planning meeting”. more

 

3time for a change in the direction you are heading, focus on center of compass....   3 Times When You May Need To Change Your Strategy

Changes to a well thought-out, well-crafted strategy shouldn’t be driven simply because it’s been in place 1, 3 or 5 years. A strategy shouldn’t necessarily be changed even if it isn’t producing results. In this situation I always look at how well (or badly) the strategy is being executed before I look at the strategy itself. So when should a company review its strategy? And what makes that review and any subsequent adaptation, revision or recreation necessary? Here are three occasions. more

4.   Adaptive Strategy – A Way To Profits In The New Normal?

Adaptive Strategy is an alternative developed by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG)1. Here’s how I think it applies to owner managed businesses. Adaptive strategy is built on the 3 R’s required in a changing environment2. Can adaptive strategy be applied in owner managed businesses? more

5.   6 Ways A Business Owner Can Influence Culture

I wrote last week about the relationship between Strategy, Culture and Leadership. As a result we’ve had some questions about how a business owner can influence the culture in his/her company. Here, in no particular priority, are 6 ways that it can be done. more

6.   6 Things We Can All Learn From Family-Owned Businesses

The 6 things I’m going to talk about come from a study of 149 large, publicly-traded, family-controlled businesses. However, stay with me because we’ve seen the same characteristics in the successful family-owned businesses we’ve dealt with – and none of them are publicly traded. Another thing – the study looked at 1997 – 2009, covering some good and some very tough times. Guess what? The family-controlled businesses, on average, turned in better long-term financial performance than non-family businesses – in multiple countries. So what are the 6 things we can learn? more

7.   6 Tips For Finding The Right Buyer

Last week I was one of three speakers at the Toronto Star’s Small Business Club event, “Exit and Succession Planning”. My talk included 6 things a business owner can do to ensure she/he finds the right buyer or successor. more

8.   3 Ways Human Nature Sabotages Strategy

Ask 10 people how long it will take them to complete a task and I’d guess 7 or 8 of them will underestimate the time required. That proportion might increase if the 10 are all type A personalities – i.e. business owners or entrepreneurs. We see this when we take teams through our strategy and business planning processes. For example, at a specific point, we prioritize the things they need to do to close the gap between their company’s current state and where they want it in 3 years’ time. Typically the teams want to tackle more items than is humanly possible given their resources. There’s no ideal number of items – the complexity of each item is only 1 of the variables – but we’ve seen time and again that completing a few key tasks produces better results than taking on too many. more

9.   5 Traits Effective Business Owners Share

I believe the single biggest thing that separates companies that grow from those that don’t is the owner’s awareness of the need for change and their willingness to do so. So, I was interested in a recent post about traits that effective entrepreneurs share. Sure enough, it contained a quote saying that if owners commit to learning more about themselves and becoming the best that they can be, they’ll find that challenges are really opportunities. But what other traits, according to the post, do effective entrepreneurs have? more

10.  Strategic Planning – 3 Things That Are Wrong With It

We all know that picking a strategy means making choices. But that means making guesses about that great unknown, the future. What happens then if we make the wrong choice? Could we destroy a company? That’s why, according to Roger Martin¹, we turn choosing a strategy into a problem that can be solved using tools we are comfortable with. And we call that strategic planning. But, Martin says, companies make 3 mistakes when they confuse strategy and strategic planning. more

 

 

Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

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Buying A Company As Part Of A Growth Strategy

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

Acquisitions fail far more often than they succeed. You can easily find statistics to prove that.Acquisitions fail far more often than they succeed.

If you’re not a numbers person, then you only have to think of AOL and Time Warner; and News Corp and MySpace.

Those are all big corporations, I know, but it’s nice to see the big guys get a bloody nose every now and then.

Buying another company, as part of a growth strategy, isn’t something that we see often.

It’s probably done most frequently when a client buys a smaller competitor in a Province, State or country they’re not already in. They’re quickly expanding their existing business by adding experienced sales, service and support staff where they had none.

What’s even less common is seeing a client buy a company whose products and services are “complimentary” to theirs.

There’s a lot for privately-owned businesses to worry about with acquisitions.

For a start, there’s getting a fair valuation for the target company and being thorough in due diligence to make sure nothing is missed. If a ‘biggie’ like Hewlett-Packard can make a mistake (with Autonomy), then anyone can.

Then, when the deal is done, there’s the whole challenge of integrating the people, who may be used to doing things in a completely different way. Not to mention different (and often incompatible) accounting and CRM systems.

When business owners buy a company for the first time, they often underestimate the lack of direct control they have over their new acquisition. And it seems to increase with the distance between the parent company and the new one. (Compare driving across a city to flying across the country to “sort something out”.)

So, why bother?

Because, like many things in life, it’s not what you do, it’s how you do it. Go back to the ‘biggies’ again for a moment and think about Google and YouTube or Best Buy and Geek Squad. Done well, acquisitions provide a great return on investment.

There’s research that says if a company is bought to expand the existing business, then it should be absorbed into the buyer as quickly as possible. Signage, letterhead and all other image stuff must be changed to that of the parent company. Duplicated or conflicting processes and systems must also be replaced. But if the acquisition is made to complement the buyer’s business, then the new subsidiary is best run separately and left with it’s own identity.

Which makes sense if you think about it this way. ABC company buys XYZ company.

If the XYZ is same business as ABC, the owner and management team at ABC already have been successful in that business and, hopefully, know why. XYZ should be folded into ABC.

If the XYZ is in a separate, but complimentary, business or industry, XYZ’s owner and management team have presumably been successful. Otherwise, ABC would have bought another company. So ABC should leave them alone.

All of which will make watching Yahoo’s acquisition of Tumblr interesting…..

 

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6 Things We Can All Learn From Family-Owned Businesses

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013

The 6 things I’m going to talk about come from a study of 149 large, publicly-traded, family-controlled businesses.

However, stay with me because we’ve seen the same characteristics in the successful family-owned businesses we’ve dealt with – and none of them are publicly traded.

Another thing – the study looked at 1997 – 2009, covering some good and some very tough times. Guess what? The family-controlled businesses, on average, turned in better long-term financial performance than non-family businesses – in multiple countries.

So what are the 6 things we can learn?

1. Family-controlled businesses are frugal in good times and bad. How? They don’t, for example, have luxurious offices. That’s because they view the company’s money as the family’s money – and so keep a tight rein on all expenses.

2. They limit their debt. The family-controlled companies in the study had, on average, debt levels equal to 37% of their capital (compared to 47% for non-family firms). Why, because if something goes wrong, family businesses don’t want to risk giving their investors too much power.

3. They have lower staff turnover. Only 9% of the workforce (versus 11% at non-family firms) turned over annually. And family firms don’t rely on financial incentives. They focus on building a culture of commitment and purpose, avoid layoffs during downturns, promote from within, and spend far more on training than non-family firms.

4. Capital expenditures are tightly controlled. One owner-CEO said “We have a simple rule, we do not spend more than we earn.” Family businesses not only look at each project’s ROI, they compare projects – to meet their self-imposed budget. It costs them some opportunities but means they’re less exposed in bad times.

5. They diversify. 46% of family businesses in the study were highly diversified, while only 20% of publicly traded ones were. The reason – diversification has become a key way to protect family wealth as recessions have become deeper and more frequent.

6. But they do fewer, smaller, acquisitions. There are exceptions, for example if there’s structural change/disruption in their industry. But generally, family companies prefer organic growth and partnerships or joint ventures to acquisitions.

The simplicity of the 6 things makes them easy for any business owner to implement.

There were 7 things mentioned in the study but the seventh, that family-controlled companies generate more of their sales abroad, applies less to the companies we work with. So I can’t talk to it from personal experience.

By the way, the study’s conclusion is that CEOs of family-controlled firms invest with a longer time horizon in mind and manage their downside more than their upside, unlike most CEOs, who try to make their mark through outperformance.

All because their obligation to family makes them concentrate on what they can do now to benefit the next generation.

You can read the full study, which was conducted by The Boston Consulting Group, here.

 

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy 5 Tips To Improve Margins and the Bottom Line……

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