Posts Tagged ‘capabilities’

Good Strategy Execution Pays Off

Tuesday, October 28th, 2014

I’ve believed for many years that how a company executes its strategy is more important than how it develops the strategy.Good strategy execution pays off well when you focus on these 7 key capabilities

I’m talking about the business strategy, the one that deals with all parts, departments or functions of a company.

My point could also apply to departmental or specific strategies; for example, sales or marketing strategies, since theoretically, these all flow from the business strategy and are integrated with it.

Previously, I’ve never had any evidence to support my belief since common sense, apparently, does not qualify as evidence.

No more.

Earlier this year, no less an authority than McKinsey & Company¹ gave me evidentiary support for my arguments.

They used their Implementation Capability Assessment to separate companies that are good at execution from those that aren’t. The survey then found that good implementers:

  • Maintain twice the value from their prioritized opportunities after 2 years.
  • Score their companies 30% higher on a series of financial performance indicators.

So there! Executing well pays off – literally.

How do you know if your company is a good implementer or a poor implementer?

McKinsey identified 7 key capabilities for executing well. Every company may have them to some extent. Yet businesses which are good at execution, are almost twice as good at them.

The 7 capabilities are:

  1. Ownership and commitment to execution at all levels of the company.
  2. Focus on a set of priorities.
  3. Clear accountability for specific actions.
  4. Effective management of execution using common tools.
  5. Planning for long-term commitment to execution.
  6. Continuous improvement during execution and rapid reaction to amend plans as required.
  7. Allocation of adequate resources and capabilities.

Finally, here’s the good news. Good implementers believe that execution is an individual discipline, which can be improved over time.

Does this confirm my belief that how a company executes its strategy is more important than how it develops the strategy?

Partially. More importantly, it does demonstrate that time spent improving a company’s ability to execute is time well invested.

As for the comparison to developing a strategy – I’ll just have to keep on looking.

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¹ “Why Implementation Matters”, McKinsey & Company Insights, August 2014

 

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

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Stick to Your Knitting or Reinvent Yourself? What’s the Right Answer?

Tuesday, August 19th, 2014

Don't knowIf you focus on what you do best, you’ll prosper. Look at Coca-Cola or Southwest Airlines or Disney.

So, understand your core competencies and stick to your knitting.

Good advice, correct?

But what about companies like Kodak and Nokia? They stayed focused on what they did best. And it really didn’t work so well for them.

So, perhaps it’s not such good advice after all.

My Dad used to say “rules are for the guidance of wise men – and the blind obedience of fools.”

Just because we drop that magic word ‘strategy’ – as in strategic consistency – into a rule, that doesn’t make it an exception to be followed blindly.

Kodak, Nokia, and a host of others like them, did understand their core competencies. But they either didn’t see, couldn’t understand – or simply ignored – a reality.

Something else started going on in their industry that made those core competencies obsolete or insufficient. In Kodak’s case, it was digital photography; in Nokia’s, the advent of the smartphone.

Perhaps a better rule for business owners is to stick to the knitting, but keep looking outside of the company in case something fundamental begins to change.

And as soon as that change becomes evident, begin reinventing – around the capabilities that brought success to the company in the first place.

That’s what Lou Gerstner did at IBM and Andy Grove did at Intel. (Much as I dislike using only large corporate entities for examples in my blog posts, they are usually well enough known for everyone to be aware of them.)

So the reinvention comes from adding new capabilities to the ones that brought success in the first place.

Ken Favaro, who wrote the article, that inspired this post and for whom I have the greatest respect, says that if you do this, you can manage the tension between strategic consistency and reinvention.

Perhaps I’m over simplifying but I see it as using common sense to deal with the changes that have, and always will occur in an industry.

But, as Stephen Covey pointed out, common sense is not that common. And it’s particularly difficult to hang on to it in the face of never ending pressure to make deadlines, maintain quality, fight off competitors, keep staff motivated – and, of course, make the payroll.

 

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Strategy, Capabilities – and The Beatles

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

It’s 50 years since the Beatles first appeared on the Ed Sullivan show and took the USA by storm.What it takes to develop a dynamic capability

At that time I was 12 years old, living in Scotland and proud of my collection of Beatles songs, all of which were recorded on the EMI label.

Now EMI was an interesting company. For example, during World War 2, they built the first airborne radar.

And in 1971 one of EMI’s engineers introduced the first commercial CT scanner. However, like many other companies, it never profited from its invention.

Why? EMI knew the market of CT scanners lay in the US, but it didn’t have manufacturing capabilities there. In the time it took to build a plant, GE and Siemens had reverse-engineered the CT scanner – and the rest is history.

This is a classic example of a company having a good strategy, but not the capabilities to exploit it.

Clearly, capabilities are crucial to success. But what are they and why are they so important?

David Teece¹  defines a capability as “a set of learned processes and activities that enable a company to produce a particular outcome”.

Ordinary capabilities are like best practices. They start in 1 or 2 companies but spread throughout an industry.

Dynamic capabilities are, on the other hand, unique to each company. They’re based on things a company has done successfully in its past and captured in business models developed over many years. As a result they’re difficult to imitate.

A business owner must do 3 things to make a capability dynamic.

First, identify and evaluate opportunities in the market. Then quickly mobilize the company’s resources to capture the value in those opportunities. Finally create an environment of continuous renewal.

Why are dynamic capabilities crucial?

EMI discovered the hard way that spotting an opportunity isn’t enough. The resources must be in place to quickly take advantage of the opportunity.

And Nokia is an example of what can happen when even market leaders aren’t in continuous renewal. Teece believes they missed the smartphone revolution because they relied on R&D which took place in Finland. Apple, based in San Francisco, was much more in touch with North American consumers’ wants and emerging technologies.

Developing dynamic capabilities could be a way to survive in a world where change is taking place more quickly than ever before.

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¹ “The Dynamic Capabilities of David Teece”, Strategy + Business, 11 Nov 13
http://www.strategy-business.com/article/00225?pg=all&tid=27782251

 

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Is Strategy Static or Variable?

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

This week’s guest is Dick Albu, the founder and president of Albu Consulting, a strategy management consulting firm focused on engaging and energizing leadership teams of middle market private and family business to formulate robust business strategies and follow through on execution of key strategic initiatives.

 

 

In last month’s issue of AlbuonStrategy we discussed three reasons why strategy fails (3 Reasons Strategy Fails).  I would like to follow up on that conversation with a question—is strategy static or variable?  From our own client experience, we believe there is both confusion and difference of opinion about the answer to this question.

Would you agree that strategy is a dynamic, continuous and adaptive process and it needs to be managed over the long term?   Let’s be honest, as sound as you might feel your strategy is today, you should never stop questioning it.  Strategy is simply a bet on the perceived future.  No one has yet found a way to predict all that will happen in the future. Rather, we accept a forecast of the future based on our current knowledge and past experiences for our business and industry.

Think about the surprises you have encountered in your business:  Technology changes, departure of key employees, competitors gaining advantages, loss of a major customer, etc., etc.  These are just a few examples of disruptions that might cause a change of course at any point during the implementation of your strategy.   In our experience, we have seen how effective this “variable” mindset can be.  The bottom line is if you accept and operate under the concept that strategy is dynamic, continuous and adaptive, you will develop a heightened awareness of internal or external changes that might impact your strategy and be better prepared to deal with these challenges in a deliberate manner.

So are all elements of your strategy variable?  No.  While your strategy needs to be dynamic, continuous and adaptive, the strategy’s foundation should be static.  The strategy’s foundation defines the way you play and win in the market. Think of it as the way you create value for your business and the capabilities that support your advantages.  Not to say that the strategy’s foundation cannot change, because it can, but it usually takes a commitment of time and resources over the long term.  This is why a client of ours decided to limit the product categories they participate in, or another international business restricted itself to operate in only a few select countries.

What are the differentiating capabilities that support your strategy’s foundation?  How do these capabilities define what business you are in and how you do business with your customers?   If you are clear about what comprises your strengths and capabilities, you will make better strategic decisions more often and with more confidence.

Your strategy needs to be variable to deal realistically with the unpredictable and stay relevant in the fast changing business world we live in.  At the same time, the foundation of your strategy needs to remain constant so that short term strategic decisions build off your value proposition and differentiating capabilities.  Are you prepared to manage this paradox?

Dick can be reached at 203-321-2147 or RAlbu@albuconsulting.com. For more information on Albu Consulting visit www.albuconsulting.com.

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