Posts Tagged ‘change in strategy’

How Do You Know If Your Company Will Fail?

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

Let me go back almost 20 years to give you some context.How do business owners know if their company is on the path to decline?

My last real job (that’s what my wife calls the jobs I had before I became a consultant) was running the Canadian subsidiary of a 100-year-old, multi-national corporation.

Our owners, a much larger, publicly listed corporation, had bought us years before as a ‘cash cow’. There was, therefore, very limited investment in any aspect of the operations.

When I joined, the core business was rapidly being replaced by a new technology. We developed a new strategy for Canada and quickly set about executing it.

But, even when we appeared to be having some success with the new strategy, I used to ask myself if it was already too late – and how I would know if it was.

Now let’s return to the present day.

I’m re-reading Jim Collins’ book “How The Mighty Fall”. It was written as a result of a CEO asking how he would know if his company, successful as it had been, was already on the path to decline.

Imagine me asking the same question as the CEO of one of America’s most successful companies – several years before he asked it. It would indeed be remarkable, were it not for a few important details.

Clearly the circumstances were different. The CEO was being more farsighted than my employers had been.

And, more importantly, I’ll bet that many business owners have worried – and still worry – over the same question. I’m sure they started long before I asked it and some are still asking it now.

So why even raise the topic?

For one thing, if Collins’ book had been available in the mid-1990s, I would have had my answer. I would have known that, in time, the company would be sold to a competitor and, when that didn’t work, be absorbed by another competitor and almost completely disappear.

For another, “How The Mighty Fall” should be mandatory reading for all business owners. Or at least for those who understand that their past successes offer no guarantee, or even protection, for the future.

One point that caught my attention – and I’m only on page 48 – is that complacency was responsible for only one of the failed companies.

Another is that being an innovator was no protection from failure.

I would have assumed the opposite in both cases. So, perhaps I’m not as far ahead as I thought…………

 

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

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