Posts Tagged ‘entertainment’

Our Internet Is Not Their Internet

Tuesday, August 14th, 2012

Our guest this week is Paul Chato, CEO at Your Web Department™, the world’s first and only hosted website management system that lets people update and design their websites without programming. It’s hard enough to succeed in one career. Paul has succeeded in four different pursuits. See below…………

 

The Internet we are celebrating and using today is the slimmest approximation of what the Internet will eventually evolve to, assuming there is some kind of end point. Kind of like the reverse of the big bang theory. We have a better idea of where the Universe is heading than how it all began and while we know how the Internet started we have no idea where it’s going.

I have come to the conclusion that all we have done so far is digitally recreate a semblance of our present and near past, and stamped it “The Future.” Sort of like those Disney Epcot displays in the 80’s. We try to find old friends on Facebook. We look up ways to fix the washing machine pump. We had home delivery of newspapers, now we have newspaper apps. I could go on, but you get the idea. We have created an Internet us oldsters find familiar and comfortable, but the problem is that people 30 years old and younger have no idea why we are fascinated by this stuff. We have deluded ourselves into thinking we have built the future. We have not. Shockingly large swaths of what we have built will be disposed of in less than 5 years after my generation’s influence wanes.

For instance, few of this cohort read the New York Times in any of its forms. Ditto for local papers. They don’t listen to Talk Radio. They have a tight group of trusted friends. They find what they like. YouTube is still cool, I think. Entertainment in many forms is hot (I include sports and eating out here). They text amongst themselves. They search for specific answers. There is less serendipity in their lives – not including the 5 Korean Kimchi restaurants Siri has found for you. There is no looking through an encyclopedia for Schweitzer only to get distracted by the history of schnitzel. Heck, there is little interest in Schweitzer. Never in our history has the past been so disposable. And let’s not even get onto the topic of politics which we’ve managed to make uninteresting, bitchy and irrelevant.

We are not creating stupid people but a different people. The impact of their influence is only now being felt and understood. One thing’s for sure, we are entering into an era of hyper-consumerism and hyper-entertainment. Buying stuff in quicker, cooler ways will intensify. The Passbook feature in Apple’s iOS 6 points to this as does NFC (being able to buy stuff with your smartphone). But don’t be shocked at the speed with which our cherished Internet institutions will be ditched.

Physical structures provide an anchor to the present and a connection to the past. The Internet provides none of that. A website can be gone in an instance. Ironically, the predictions of the death of bricks and mortar stores at the start of the Internet big bang had it completely wrong. We know that now. Physical stores are hugely important in this age of hyper-consumerism. They are Brand Anchors. They are movie stars.

Retailers are ‘stars’

Anyone can buy stuff from Home Depot online but when you choose to go to the actual store people get that, “OMG, I’m actually at the store!” buzz. Buying something from a Lululemon outlet is like getting an autograph. Retailers must view their stores as their ‘stars on tour’. Come visit Canadian Tire. Get the t-shirt.

So, hyper-consumerism/hyper-entertainment I can see. The Internet will be unrecognizable in 10 years, but my crystal ball is cloudy as to how that will transpire. Are you ready to embrace this new Internet? If you’re a business, you’d better start thinking about it. Me? Just wake me up in 10 years.

More About Paul:
At first pursuing a potential career in nuclear physics, Paul chose, instead, to develop his creative skills. After graduating from Ryerson’s Radio Television Arts program he started Chato Art Ink, one of Toronto’s more successful independent design firms. He stopped designing to take up comedy, helping to form the now legendary Frantics Comedy Troupe, and will be forever remembered as Mr. Canoehead, “Canada’s aluminum-headed crime fighter.” Paul then joined the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation rising to the position of Head of TV Comedy. After considering a move to Los Angeles to take up a position as VP of Development at a major Hollywood studio, Paul instead chose to exercise his interest in computers. He started Electramedia and in the intervening years produced the hugely successful CD-ROM game Jewels of the Oracle, hundreds of corporate presentations, videos and Internet sites. In 1997 Electramedia switched its focus 100% to the Internet and most recently has become Your Web Department™.


If you would like to contact Paul email him at
paul@yourwebdepartment.com

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