Posts Tagged ‘family business’

Recommended Reading – Summer 2015

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

After another rough winter, summer’s almost here! We’ll soon be reveling in sunshine, hot temperatures and blue skies as we enjoy water sports, barbeques, and relaxing in a lounger or hammock with a good book. Here are some of the personal favourites we’ve selected from the various “best books in 2015” lists recently published on 800ceo read’s blog:

1.  The Rise and Fall of Strategic Planning
     Henry Mintzberg, Free Press

If you follow our blog you’ll know that Henry Mintzberg is one of my favourite strategic thinkers. In this definitive history, he argues that the term is an oxymoron – that strategy cannot be planned because planning is about analysis and strategy is about synthesis. That is why, he asserts, the process has failed so often and so dramatically. He unmasks the press that has mesmerized so many organizations since 1965: strategic planning.

Mintzberg proposes new and unusual definitions of planning and strategy, and examines in novel and insightful ways the various models of strategic planning and the evidence of why they failed. Reviewing the so-called “pitfalls” of planning, he shows how the process itself can destroy commitment, narrow a company’s vision, discourage change, and breed an atmosphere of politics.

Henry Mintzberg is one of the most brilliant and original management thinkers and a great Canadian.

2.  Family Business: Practical Leadership Succession Planning: Exceed Your Expectations
     Ronald P. Smyser, Abbott Press

Less than 15% of family businesses survive to and through the second generation of leadership.

Smyser’s book provides valuable insights which demystify and simplify the process of succession; help ensure continuing financial security for the founder and his/her family; and enhance the effectiveness and balance of professional and private life.

Some of the topics he covers are:

  • How ownership transition without a clear, practical leadership succession plan can decimate your business’s chance of survival.
  • The fifteen key causes of leadership succession failure and how to avoid them.
  • What the next generation really wants but won’t tell you and what you should do.
  • The issues around choosing one of your children to succeed you, and how to avoid them.

Whether you already have a family business or are starting one, “Family Business: Practical Leadership Succession Planning” is a must read.

3.  Fewer, Bigger, Bolder: From Mindless Expansion to Focused Growth
     Sanjay Khosla and Mohanbir Sawhney, Portfolio

When it comes to growing revenues, not all dollars are equal. In company after company that the authors worked for or researched, they saw businesses taking on more products, markets, people, acquisitions – more of everything except what really mattered: sustainable and profitable growth.

In many of these companies – large or small, from America to Europe to Asia – every quarter became a mad dash to find yet another short-term revenue boost. There had to be a better way. The answer lies in “Fewer, Bigger, Bolder”, a market-proven, step-by-step program to achieve sustained growth with rising profits and lower costs.

“Fewer, Bigger, Bolder” crosses the usual boundaries of strategy, execution, people and organization. Its framework shows how you can drive growth by targeting resources against priorities, simplifying your operations, and unleashing the potential of your people.

“Fewer, Bigger, Bolder” challenges the conventional wisdom about growth.

4.  Business Strategy: A Guide to Effective Decision-Making
     Jeremy Kourdi, The Economist

A good strategy, well implemented, determines a business’ future success or failure.

Yet history is full of strategic decisions that were ill-conceived, poorly organized and consequently disastrous. This updated guide looks at the whole process of strategic decision-making, from vision, forecasting, and resource allocation, through to implementation and innovation.

Strategy is about understanding where you are now, where you are heading and how you will get there.

But getting it right involves difficult choices: which customers to target, what products to offer, and the best way to keep costs low and service high. And constantly changing business conditions inevitably bring risks. Even after business strategy has been developed, a company must remain nimble and alert to change, and view strategy as an ongoing and evolving process.

The message of this guide is simple: strategy matters, and getting it right is fundamental to business success.

5.  Business Strategy: Managing Uncertainty, Opportunity, and Enterprise
     J.-C. Spender, Oxford University Press

Emphasizing that firms face uncertainties and unknowns, Spender argues that the core of strategic thinking and processes rests on leaders developing newly imagined solutions to the opportunities that these uncertainties open up.

Drawing on a wide range of ideas, he stresses the importance of judgment in strategy, and argues that a key element of the entrepreneur and executive’s task is to engage chosen uncertainties, develop a language to express and explain the firm’s particular business model for dealing with these, and thus create innovation and value.

At the same time he shows how the language the strategist creates to do this gives the firm identity and purpose, and communicates this to its members, stakeholders, and customers.

Spender introduces these ideas, and reviews the strategy tools currently available from consultants and academics.

The book outlines a structured practice that managers and consultants might chose to follow, not a theory.

6.  Reinventors: How Extraordinary Companies Pursue Radical Continuous Change
     Jason Jennings, Portfolio

For most businesses, success is fleeting. There are only two real choices: stick with the status quo until things inevitably decline, or continuously change to stay vital. But how?

Bestselling leadership and management guru Jason Jennings and his researchers screened 22,000 companies around the world that had been cited as great examples of reinvention.

They selected the best, verified their success, interviewed their leaders, and learned how they pursue never-ending radical change. The fresh insights they discovered became Jennings’s “reinvention rules” for any business. The featured companies include Starbucks—which turned itself around by making tons of small bets on new ideas.

7.  The Moment You Can’t Ignore: When Big Trouble Leads to a Great Future: How Culture Drives Strategic Change
     Malachi O’Connor and Barry Dornfeld, Public Affairs

Culture not only affects how we think and behave, it’s the set of agreements and behaviors that drive how we act in groups and the decisions we collectively make.

Every organization now faces challenges it can’t ignore as new forms of work, communication and technology wreak havoc on the way we do things.

Malachi O’Connor and Barry Dornfeld provide powerful insights on how to confront the clash of old and new. They show how to ask the big questions that point the way to renewing a culture.

When people don’t know who’s in charge, are unsure of what their company identity is, and can’t get behind their leaders, they rarely have the ability or will to innovate.

Old ideas get rehashed. New ideas get squashed or lost. Initiatives that are designed to create an innovation culture or spur creativity go nowhere.

8.  Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done
    Larry Bossidy, Ram Charan, Crown Business

Finally – an old favourite – a book that shows how to get the job done and deliver results.

The leader’s most important job is selecting and appraising people. Why? With the right people in the right jobs, there’s a leadership gene pool that conceives and selects a strategy that can be executed, a strategy in sync with the realities of the marketplace, the economy, and the competition.

Once the right people and strategy are in place, they are then linked to an operating process that results in the implementation of specific programs and actions and that assigns accountability.

This kind of effective operating process goes way beyond the typical budget exercise that looks into a rearview mirror to set its goals. It puts reality behind the numbers and is where the rubber meets the road.

Putting an execution culture in place is hard, but losing it is easy.

For a full listing of best books in 2015, please visit http://800ceoread.com/

 

Click here and automatically receive our latest blog posts.

 

Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Share

From Strategy to Results – Plus Some Succession Planning

Tuesday, January 6th, 2015

In an ’80s TV series called “The A Team”, one of the main characters used to say “I love it when a plan comes together”.Good strategy executed successfully

Here’s a wonderful example of a real life plan coming together.

In 2009 a recruiting company called LEAPJob hired us to help them with their business strategy.

It was a family business founded by Donna and Marcus Miller. One of their sons, Jeremy, worked in the firm with them. Stephen, their other son, had a very successful career with a large software company.

There were 3 major issues to consider.

First, the Millers believed the recruiting industry was undergoing fundamental change. They were concerned about the future for smaller companies.

Second, LEAPJob had an extremely high level of brand recognition in its target market and a very successful on-line lead generation engine.

Finally, Donna and Marcus were thinking about retiring.

The outcome was a 2-step strategy.

The recruiting business would be sold in approximately 3 years and Donna and Marcus would retire.

While they were positioning LEAPJob for sale, Donna and Marcus would help Jeremy launch a new business. This would leverage his skills in marketing and branding – competencies Jeremy had honed by leading the rebranding effort and building the lead generation engine.

Fast forward to January 2015.

Jeremy’s first book, published by an established Canadian label, is about to be launched. It will be available in stores and on-line via Amazon, Barnes and Noble and iBooks, amongst others, in a few days’ time.

The title of the book “Sticky Branding” is also the name of his company.

Jeremy’s commented a number of times over the years that our process played a significant role in his journey.

But the idea to pinpoint and profile small and mid-sized companies with sticky brands; the analytical skills to see the factors common to them; and the creativity to combine those factors and his own experience were all Jeremy’s.

The result – lessons which can be applied by the owners of small and mid-sized companies who want their companies to “stand out, attract customers & grow an incredible brand”

He’s had to deal with some hard knocks and tough times but now Jeremy is on the brink of success. I admire his focus and willpower.

Donna and Marcus are happily retired.

I love it when a good strategy is executed successfully.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Strategies That Get Results Are Developed By Thinkers And Doers

Click here and automatically receive our latest blog posts.

 

Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

ProfitPATH’s Top Ten Blogs – First Half 2014

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

 

1.   6 Challenges Fast Growing Companies Face

I’ve mentioned Inc. magazine www.inc.com several times before. It’s a great resource. There’s a well-researched article in the current issue about 6 challenges fast growing companies face. They’re all about execution – and if the owner doesn’t deal with them well any one of them can be fatal. more

 

 

Strategy is not planning and the importance of knowing the difference2.   The Difference Between A Strategy And A Plan

I want to talk briefly about what I think is one of the worst mistakes – confusing strategy and planning. Roger Martin wrote a post for the HBR last month in which he dealt with this very topic. I frequently hear business owners talk about the need to do “strategic planning” in order to create a “strategic plan”. Some talk – every year – about holding a “strategic planning meeting”. more

 

3time for a change in the direction you are heading, focus on center of compass....   3 Times When You May Need To Change Your Strategy

Changes to a well thought-out, well-crafted strategy shouldn’t be driven simply because it’s been in place 1, 3 or 5 years. A strategy shouldn’t necessarily be changed even if it isn’t producing results. In this situation I always look at how well (or badly) the strategy is being executed before I look at the strategy itself. So when should a company review its strategy? And what makes that review and any subsequent adaptation, revision or recreation necessary? Here are three occasions. more

4.   Adaptive Strategy – A Way To Profits In The New Normal?

Adaptive Strategy is an alternative developed by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG)1. Here’s how I think it applies to owner managed businesses. Adaptive strategy is built on the 3 R’s required in a changing environment2. Can adaptive strategy be applied in owner managed businesses? more

5.   6 Ways A Business Owner Can Influence Culture

I wrote last week about the relationship between Strategy, Culture and Leadership. As a result we’ve had some questions about how a business owner can influence the culture in his/her company. Here, in no particular priority, are 6 ways that it can be done. more

6.   6 Things We Can All Learn From Family-Owned Businesses

The 6 things I’m going to talk about come from a study of 149 large, publicly-traded, family-controlled businesses. However, stay with me because we’ve seen the same characteristics in the successful family-owned businesses we’ve dealt with – and none of them are publicly traded. Another thing – the study looked at 1997 – 2009, covering some good and some very tough times. Guess what? The family-controlled businesses, on average, turned in better long-term financial performance than non-family businesses – in multiple countries. So what are the 6 things we can learn? more

7.   6 Tips For Finding The Right Buyer

Last week I was one of three speakers at the Toronto Star’s Small Business Club event, “Exit and Succession Planning”. My talk included 6 things a business owner can do to ensure she/he finds the right buyer or successor. more

8.   3 Ways Human Nature Sabotages Strategy

Ask 10 people how long it will take them to complete a task and I’d guess 7 or 8 of them will underestimate the time required. That proportion might increase if the 10 are all type A personalities – i.e. business owners or entrepreneurs. We see this when we take teams through our strategy and business planning processes. For example, at a specific point, we prioritize the things they need to do to close the gap between their company’s current state and where they want it in 3 years’ time. Typically the teams want to tackle more items than is humanly possible given their resources. There’s no ideal number of items – the complexity of each item is only 1 of the variables – but we’ve seen time and again that completing a few key tasks produces better results than taking on too many. more

9.   5 Traits Effective Business Owners Share

I believe the single biggest thing that separates companies that grow from those that don’t is the owner’s awareness of the need for change and their willingness to do so. So, I was interested in a recent post about traits that effective entrepreneurs share. Sure enough, it contained a quote saying that if owners commit to learning more about themselves and becoming the best that they can be, they’ll find that challenges are really opportunities. But what other traits, according to the post, do effective entrepreneurs have? more

10.  Strategic Planning – 3 Things That Are Wrong With It

We all know that picking a strategy means making choices. But that means making guesses about that great unknown, the future. What happens then if we make the wrong choice? Could we destroy a company? That’s why, according to Roger Martin¹, we turn choosing a strategy into a problem that can be solved using tools we are comfortable with. And we call that strategic planning. But, Martin says, companies make 3 mistakes when they confuse strategy and strategic planning. more

 

 

Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

One Way To Destroy A Family Business

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

Do you recognize this individual?Coddled offspring can destroy a family business

Well-dressed, well-groomed, drives a late model luxury car.

May be charming and pleasant. In some cases, however, they can be arrogant, abrasive and (over) confident.

Not yet, too vague? OK, here are some other clues.

He or she has:

•  Worked exclusively in their family’s business.
•  Reported directly or indirectly to a parent for most, or all, of their career.
•  Never received 360-degree feedback on their performance.
•  Been promoted beyond their capabilities.

In addition:

•  They’re paid above the market-based compensation for their position.
•  Their behavior is often outside the boundaries of acceptable value-based behavior of the company.

Now are you closing in?

At one time or another, professionally or socially, we have all met the coddled or pampered son or daughter.

Some might say they’ve been spoiled. I’m not sure it’s that simple.

Here’s the point. In the eyes of the doting parent they can do no wrong. But, in reality, they inflict damage on the family business. And the longer they are around, the higher they climb, the greater the potential for them to do fatal damage.

Non-family employees react in one of two ways. Those who need their income find ways to keep quiet and live with the situation. Those who are mobile move. Both outcomes hurt the company.

The only people who can fix this situation are the other family-owners and, possibly, long-term employees who have earned the deep trust of the business owner.

The owner/parent will not thank them for doing so. In fact the parent’s initial reaction can range from dismissive to very angry. However, if the parent doesn’t come to terms with the situation, they risk losing all of the family wealth tied up in the company.

What can be done?

We tell our clients to let their children go and work in another company before they start, full time, in the family business.

Ideally, they work in a corporation where they get honest, regular feedback about their performance. But another family business will do – provided 2 conditions are met. It’s using performance management systems and the owners are neither friends of, or related to, the owner/parents.

For the owner/parents themselves it’s a little harder. Getting perspective on their children’s, or other family members’, abilities and performance, from a third party the owner can trust to be objective, is the best thing. A member of an Advisory, or traditional, Board can be very useful for that. But a friend or long-term business advisor can fill the role too.

Final words

When over-protected children are asked to leave the family company they often find it a great relief. They know they were in over their heads.

Ironic isn’t it?

You can find the article that inspired this post here.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Why Conflict In A Family Business Is Bad For Strategy

Click here and automatically receive our latest blog posts.

Keeping the Business in the Family – A Cautionary Tale

Tuesday, August 13th, 2013

The stories written by the children who bought family businesses should be mandatory reading for all business owners.http://www.profitpath.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/iStock_000016746886XSmall.jpg

Let’s face it, the successors have a unique perspective. They’ve seen what does happen, not what might happen.

For example, a young Australian woman – let’s call her Alex – was told by her father that he had only 12 to 18 months to live. Would she buy the family business?

She, of course, said yes. Most of us would have done.

The company printed “What’s On in Sydney” and distributed it through every hotel in the city. Over the years there had been offers for the business, but they hadn’t met her father’s valuation so he hadn’t taken them.

Alex was a successful freelance writer. She’d never run a business and, until her father announced his illness, had never shown interest in the family one.

She co-opted a brother to redesigning the magazine, they built a web site and her father introduced her to all of her advertisers. And she got to spend 2 or 3 days a week with her father as he taught her the business.

But, after a few months, Alex realized that, while she loved writing, she hated selling advertising so much that she couldn’t keep on doing it.

And she had to tell her father.

So, one day a few weeks before he died, Alex called him. She felt devastated, that she had really let him down.

Soon afterwards he was admitted to palliative care.

With her father’s business partner, Alex found a business broker and put the business up for sale just before her father died.

What’s to be learned?

1.  Her father had passed up opportunities to sell the business because he was stubborn about the valuation that he wanted. He should have compromised. In these circumstances the company probably sold for less than it would have done had the sale been well planned.

2.  Alex responded with emotion rather than logic when asked to buy the business.

3.  Would things have been different if her dad had brought Alex and her brother into the business earlier? They could have complemented each other – Alex writing, her brother doing the design work and her father selling ads.

4.  With more time to prepare, they could possibly have hired someone to replace her dad.

Alex describes the experience as being “rough at the time”. That’s probably an understatement.

Losing a parent is hard. Watching one wilt under cancer has to be worse.

Moving into and learning a business is difficult in the best of times. Deciding to sell is probably one of the hardest things that anyone does in their life.

Dealing with two major life events at once cannot be easy.

And it’s all so avoidable. It’s called succession planning.

If you want to read the story in Alex’s words go here.

 

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy 4 Reasons Why Every Business Should Be Sold…..Eventually

Click here and automatically receive our latest blog posts.

Why Conflict In A Family Business Is Bad For Strategy

Tuesday, July 23rd, 2013

We’ve worked in a lot of family businesses over the past 12 years.The negative impacts of confrontation and infighting on strategy

During that time we’ve had assignments disrupted, even brought to a premature end by family conflict.

I’ve seen family members say, and do, some terrible things to each other.

It’s not as if it’s a new experience. I saw some ugly political games in the 25 years I spent climbing the corporate ladder.

Confrontation and infighting are bad for any business. Their impact on the strategy, however brilliant and well executed, can be enormous.

There’s a difference though. In a family business, the damage isn’t just to the company.

The unpleasantness spills over into private lives, and relationships that should be close – parents and children, brothers and sisters – are shattered. And sometimes they remain unrepaired until it’s too late, because one of the parties dies.

I’d realized that the conflict in family firms seemed more intense than the ones I’d seen in my corporate days. But I hadn’t realized why until a blog post I read recently made it clear.

Corporations have barriers that prevent conflict becoming too ugly. Rules, processes and structures govern the behavior of every employee, from the lowest to the highest. For example, if a manager talks or behaves inappropriately, he will find himself on the wrong end of disciplinary action initiated by HR.

The same rules exist in many family businesses, but they apply to everyone except the owners.

Why? Family members apply the dynamics from their personal relationships to business situations – even though they know they shouldn’t. For example:

•  When a child becomes an adult and joins the family firm, the parent who raised her remembers her missteps and miscues from childhood and adolescence.

•  Parents try to resolve disputes by forcing everyone to toe the line.

•  Siblings deal with difficult circumstances by withdrawing, avoiding, or undermining each other.

Even if the child has left the family home, the plant or office can become a replacement.

As the owners of the business, the family can ignore the rules or processes. So there is nothing to stop conflict, caused by the ineffective behavior of both generations, blowing the lid off the family’s assumed harmony and threatening the success of the business.

Does this mean that every family business is fated to erupt into a bitter fight? No, of course not.

Some families use their values, long-term orientation to their investment and loyalty to employees and customers to maintain a “professional management” approach to challenges, problems and conflict.   In the other cases, family members can be helped to understand that conflicts can result if there are no formal boundaries on their behavior.

And, in fact, we have been able to help families like these, put greater structure in place. Which enables focus to go back on the execution of the strategy and getting results.

If you want to read the full blog post you can find it here.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Little Things Can Have a Big Impact

Click here and automatically receive our latest blog posts.

6 Things We Can All Learn From Family-Owned Businesses

Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013

The 6 things I’m going to talk about come from a study of 149 large, publicly-traded, family-controlled businesses.

However, stay with me because we’ve seen the same characteristics in the successful family-owned businesses we’ve dealt with – and none of them are publicly traded.

Another thing – the study looked at 1997 – 2009, covering some good and some very tough times. Guess what? The family-controlled businesses, on average, turned in better long-term financial performance than non-family businesses – in multiple countries.

So what are the 6 things we can learn?

1. Family-controlled businesses are frugal in good times and bad. How? They don’t, for example, have luxurious offices. That’s because they view the company’s money as the family’s money – and so keep a tight rein on all expenses.

2. They limit their debt. The family-controlled companies in the study had, on average, debt levels equal to 37% of their capital (compared to 47% for non-family firms). Why, because if something goes wrong, family businesses don’t want to risk giving their investors too much power.

3. They have lower staff turnover. Only 9% of the workforce (versus 11% at non-family firms) turned over annually. And family firms don’t rely on financial incentives. They focus on building a culture of commitment and purpose, avoid layoffs during downturns, promote from within, and spend far more on training than non-family firms.

4. Capital expenditures are tightly controlled. One owner-CEO said “We have a simple rule, we do not spend more than we earn.” Family businesses not only look at each project’s ROI, they compare projects – to meet their self-imposed budget. It costs them some opportunities but means they’re less exposed in bad times.

5. They diversify. 46% of family businesses in the study were highly diversified, while only 20% of publicly traded ones were. The reason – diversification has become a key way to protect family wealth as recessions have become deeper and more frequent.

6. But they do fewer, smaller, acquisitions. There are exceptions, for example if there’s structural change/disruption in their industry. But generally, family companies prefer organic growth and partnerships or joint ventures to acquisitions.

The simplicity of the 6 things makes them easy for any business owner to implement.

There were 7 things mentioned in the study but the seventh, that family-controlled companies generate more of their sales abroad, applies less to the companies we work with. So I can’t talk to it from personal experience.

By the way, the study’s conclusion is that CEOs of family-controlled firms invest with a longer time horizon in mind and manage their downside more than their upside, unlike most CEOs, who try to make their mark through outperformance.

All because their obligation to family makes them concentrate on what they can do now to benefit the next generation.

You can read the full study, which was conducted by The Boston Consulting Group, here.

 

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy 5 Tips To Improve Margins and the Bottom Line……

Click here and automatically receive our latest blog posts.

 

Post History