Posts Tagged ‘goals’

Get Results From Your Strategy Offsites

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

Holding a strategy offsite is like going to the dentist.Get results from strategy offsites with these tips

Doing it regularly should prevent unexpected pain and discomfort.

But going to the dentist is something that can be avoided. Why do it when everything’s going well, when it’s not necessary?

After all, a visit to the dentist can result in discomfort or even end badly.

It’s the same thing with a planning meeting.

It’s uncomfortable when, for example, people don’t want to get behind the business owner’s ‘stretch’ goals. And most people can look back on an offsite they attended and wonder why they bothered – because nothing changed.

So here are some things we’ve learned to ensure strategy offsites deliver results.

1.    Before the meeting

Set a realistic goal.

I ask clients to imagine we’re packing up after the last day of the offsite, and they’re feeling really good about what has been achieved.

Then I ask them what has to have happened for them to be feeling that way.

Sometimes, after they reply, we have to use our experience to illustrate what can, and can’t, be achieved in 1 or 2 days.

Distribute pre-work before the strategy offsite to maximize productivity in the time spent face-to-face. Any thinking that can be done in advance should be and any information required to make decisions should be distributed and studied.

2.    During the offsite

Keep people focused by:

• Announcing times for coffee and lunch breaks and insisting email and calls are dealt with then.

• Using a  ‘parking lot’ to record topics that are important, but not immediately relevant. Clear it at the end of each day.

Relieve the intensity of the discussions by using brainteasers and humorous video clips. Vary the pace, and make sure everyone’s thoughts are heard, by using sub-groups for some sessions.

Our process ends with the development of specific, measurable, time-related action plans to solve the problem that was the focus of the offsite.  Appoint Champions to coordinate the completion of the Plans.

This way everyone leaves with a sense of accomplishment and a clear plan of action.

3.    After the meeting

Capitalize on the momentum by holding regular, structured follow-up meetings.

Get everyone together at least once a quarter. Each Champion gives a progress report on his or her Action Plan and adjustments are made if necessary.

Take these tips and you’ll get results from your strategy offsites.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy What’s The Best Strategy – Grow The Core Or Expand?

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

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What is a Strategy Focused Organization?

Tuesday, February 17th, 2015

 

This week’s guest is Dick Albu, the founder and president of Albu Consulting, a strategy management consulting firm focused on engaging and energizing leadership teams of middle market private and family business to formulate robust business strategies and follow through on execution of key strategic initiatives.

 

 

The ultimate prize for all NFL football teams is a Super Bowl win.  There is no greater reward for a well planned and executed season.  Management, coaches, and players need to be aligned and focused for every game.  They also need to be committed to the overall team strategy.  Successful teams embrace the strategy focused organization model.

What can business owners and CEO’s learn from these NFL football teams?  A strategy focused organization understands that strategy is dynamic and it has adapted a continuous strategy management process of addressing issues and weaknesses, leveraging strengths, and exploiting opportunities on a timely basis. As with a winning football team, the ability to successfully execute the game plan is critical to business owners and their management teams. Here are three key elements for successful strategy execution.

Mobilize and engage the senior team – Alignment and commitment from the senior team is an essential ingredient to success.  Without complete buy-in from the leadership team, it is a sure bet that little change will happen.  Management and coaches all need to be on the same page, guided by a strategy that everyone has bought into.  Involving and getting buy-in from all managers through a collaborative process is critical to creating a strategy focused organization.  Keep in mind that this type of engagement does not happen overnight.  Establishing a strategy focused organization happens over years, not weeks or months.

Translate strategy to action in a way everyone can understand – Use a simple system that everyone can understand to explain who needs to do what by when.   Successful coaches make game plans easy to understand and make execution as flawless possible.   In our experience, a simple framework where objectives, initiatives and tactics are aligned creates a great deal of clarity and ensures engagement.   Employees get energized when they understand how they can contribute to the success of the strategy.

Embed the strategy execution process into day-to-day business operations – Organizations need a predictive, consistent, and continuous methodology to manage strategy execution.  Coaches are constantly making adjustments to their strategy as the season progresses because they appreciate that the football season is dynamic.  New opportunities or critical issues come up at any time, like an injury that leaves you without your starting quarterback.   Organizations need to think in the same way.  Strategy requires a dynamic and continuous process with consistent follow up throughout the year with the entire organization. Our approach with clients requires an ongoing execution process of monthly, quarterly, and annual meetings to measure, review progress and adapt strategy as necessary .

There are obviously many more aspects to creating a strategy focused organization that can lead change and improve performance.  Skipping any of these elements will prevent any company from achieving success.  We would like to hear your reaction to these important points, and let us know how you are creating a strategy focused organization.

Dick can be reached at 203-321-2147 or RAlbu@albuconsulting.com. For more information on Albu Consulting visit www.albuconsulting.com.

Top Ten In 2014……

Monday, December 29th, 2014

The results are in!

Our top 10 blog posts in 2014 were:

1.   Adaptive Strategy – A Way To Profits In The New Normal? looks at an alternative strategy that is built on the 3 R’s (Responsiveness, Resilience, Readiness) required in a changing environment.

2.   6 Ways A Business Owner Can Influence Culture looks at the ways a business owner can develop a culture which will help increase operating profits and build shareholder value.

3.   6 Challenges Fast Growing Companies Face discusses the 6 challenges of execution which, if not dealt with, could prove fatal.

4.   3 Times When You May Need To Change Your Strategy explains when a company should review its strategy and what makes that review and any subsequent actions necessary.

5.   The Difference Between A Strategy And A Plan talks about the difference between strategy and planning and why it’s important to understand what these terms mean.

6.   6 Things We Can All Learn From Family-Owned Business puts forward 6 simple things business owners can implement to achieve better long-term financial performances.

7.  Use These 3 Tips To Make Your Next Critical Decision offers 3 things Ram Charan, co-author of “Execution”, says business leaders do when faced with a critical decision.

8.  5 Traits Effective Business Owners Share outlines some of the traits effective entrepreneurs have in common that contribute to the growth of their businesses.

9.  3 Reasons Why Consulting Assignments Fail and 3 Reasons Why Consulting Assignments Fail – Part 2 addresses the most common reasons why things can go wrong between consultants and their clients.

10. Strategic Planning – 3 Things That Are Wrong With It outlines how business owners make 3 mistakes that could destroy their company when they confuse strategy and strategic planning.

If you missed any of them, here’s another opportunity!

One Big Reason Why Strategies Fail

Tuesday, September 9th, 2014

the main reason a strategy fails is based in how it’s executedI often argue that a strategy isn’t important.

It’s the benefits a strategy delivers – more profit, increasing the value of a company – that are important. They put more money in the owner’s pocket.

To reap those benefits the strategy must, of course, be successful.

A strategy can fail for many reasons.

It could just be a lousy strategy. But that happens less often than you might think.

Even a poorly conceived strategy can deliver results – if it’s executed with focus, energy and passion.

I believe the main reason a strategy fails is based in how it’s executed.

For example:

  • There’s no link between the strategy and the actions which have to be completed if it’s to be successful.
  • Most people don’t know what the strategy is – and the part their job has to play in making it successful.
  • People, at all levels, do know what their role is – but there’s no accountability if they miss targets.

Some examples are less evident.

One in particular is quite insidious. It goes like this.

After intense discussion, the owner and management team reach a consensus on the strategy for the next 3 years. Everyone goes off determined to do the right things to execute it successfully.

However, since much of their time is taken up with running the business day-to-day, after a while, that begins to affect their perspective.

And that gradual, subtle change in perspective can have a major impact on the execution of their strategy.

It is possible to detect it and fix it. But that requires the discipline to do 2 things.

First, hold regular strategy review meetings. Second, keep the agenda off day-to-day stuff, and on measuring progress toward the 3-year goal.

Any shift in perspective can be spotted by asking one question. “Are all of the projects being discussed integrated/aligned with the strategy we chose for the next 3 years?”

The odds are there will be some drift.

That’s because the company is made up of people. And people tend to have their own priorities, concerns, agenda, and goals – which may be directly opposed to the next person’s. In the face of day-to-day pressures, people find it hard to keep the whole company perspective in mind.

But it can be restored – and one big reason why execution fails can be easily avoided.

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Strategy Execution – How You Do What You Do

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Jim StewartJim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Can A Vision Still Get Results If You Call It Something Else?

Tuesday, July 29th, 2014

I use words like Vision or Mission selectively.A vision by any other name can still get results

I learned quickly, when I started ProfitPATH, that, while some business owners like them, others tune out immediately when they hear those words.

You can almost feel them physically withdraw from the conversation.

And I have no problem with that.

I suspect some entrepreneurs feel that way because:

  • In their eyes, the people who use terms like Vision and Mission have never actually had to deliver business results. They’re, typically, consultants and authors of business best sellers.
  • Anyone who has been very successful and uses language like Vision or competitive advantage runs a “large”, public corporation and so is totally unlike them.

You could argue they’re making sweeping generalizations – but they’re far from the only group of people who do that!

But what, for example, is a Vision?

Isn’t it just a picture of what a company wants to be in the future? Where the owner wants to take it? How it would like to be seen by groups like customers, suppliers, even competitors?

Over the last 13 years, I’ve learned that even the most skeptical business owners will agree that if you don’t know where you’re going, you’ll never get there.

So what matters more – the concept, or the words or label you use to describe it?

Isn’t there a risk that if we get too hung up on the label, we’ll turn our back on the benefits that flow from the concept?

There’s no doubt in my mind that having a clear picture of where you want your company to be, what you want it to look like, in 3 years’ time is one of the foundations for success.

Why am I so sure of that?

Alan Mulally is widely credited with turning Ford around. He was quoted recently as saying “What I’ve learned is the power of a compelling vision.”

He used the 2 words “One Ford” to focus a troubled, global company and produce 19 consecutive profitable quarters.

The 2 words were the tip of a more comprehensive picture, which was broadly understood and provided a compelling, actionable and clear direction.

Another example is John Kennedy’s vision for the U.S. in 1961 – to land a man on the moon and return him safely to earth by the end of the decade.

Few believed it possible at the time.

But we know what actually happened.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Strategies That Get Results Are Developed By Thinkers And Doers

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Strategy Execution – How You Do What You Do

Tuesday, July 8th, 2014

Twice in a week.Business strategists echo what we've been telling our clients about strategy execution

That’s how often I’ve encountered credible, experienced business strategists echoing what we’ve been telling our clients.

First, it was the Wall Street Journal (WSJ), now it’s Roger Martin.

Both of them express their points of view in a way that’s different to the other and to us. In Martin’s case, it’s through the lens of his own approach to strategy execution.

Despite that, we’re all saying the same thing.

In my last post, I explained how the WSJ’s approach dovetailed with ours. Here’s how I think Roger Martin’s does.

Martin says that:

  • “…it is absolutely critical that each person in the organization knows what it means to take actions that are consistent with the intent of the strategy as asserted.”
  • To do that every person has to think about 4 things – the strategic intent of their managers/leaders; the key choices they make in their work; how to align those choices with those above them; and how they communicate the reason for their choices to their reports.

How does that align with our approach, which says that to execute its strategy successfully, a company has to avoid 4 Risks?

•  Since a strategy has been “asserted”, then Risk #1 – No Clear Growth Path – has been removed.

•  The title of Martin’s post is “Strategy Isn’t What You Say, Its What You Do” and he talks specifically about taking “action” in the quote above and on several other occasions. Risk #2 – No Link To Action – is dealt with.

•  Risk #3 – No Buy In – means that employees are not motivated by the strategy or engaged in its execution. To get buy in, we say the strategy, the initiatives required to execute it and the actions and goals which will turn the initiatives into results, must be linked directly to the goals of each department and individual employee in the company. The 4 things that Martin says every person has to think about cover precisely that.

•  Our fourth Risk – No Accountability – isn’t discussed in Martin’s post, but I’ve seen enough of his work to believe that he considers accountability as critical as we do.

Finally, in the interests of full disclosure, I should say that I think:

  • Roger Martin’s book “Playing To Win” is one of the most logical, easy to understand and practical approaches to strategy I’ve read.
  • The WSJ’s statement of the main requirements for successfully executing a strategy is nice, clear and succinct.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy 5 Reasons Why I Love Execution

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

The Keys To Executing A Strategy And Getting Results

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014

I really liked a recent post in the Wall Street Journal (WSJ).The keys to executing a strategy and getting results

It said that the main requirements for successfully executing a strategy are:

  1. Clear goals for everyone in the organization, that support the overall strategy
  2. A way to regularly measure progress toward those goals
  3. Clear accountability for that progress.

That’s a very nice, clear, succinct way to put it.

I must admit that I was a little relieved when I saw their next sentence, which said that these 3 “are the basics”.

That clarification allows the discussion to continue, so that additional factors can be included. The authors themselves went on to say that good execution also requires facing reality and a strong culture of execution.

Those are 2 of the points made by Larry Bossidy and Ram Charan in “Execution”, one of the best books ever written on the subject.

On the other hand, I was pleased to see the 3 main requirements.

Why? Well, they correspond nicely with the 4 Risks I’ve talked about in recent posts. Here’s how.

Risk #1 – No Clear Growth Path:  The ‘overall strategy’, mentioned above, incorporates the path a company takes to grow to size in the future.

Risk #2 – No Link To Action:  A key step in linking a strategy to action is to develop clear goals. The best goals are specific, measurable, and attainable and have deadlines. They are also a result of prioritizing everything that has to be done so that limited resources can be allocated to get the best return.

Risk #3 – No Buy In:  Giving every employee clear goals, which support the overall strategy, is an important factor in getting buy in. Involving employees in developing those goals is another. A third is frequent, ongoing communication so that everyone understands how achieving their goals will help the organization achieve its goals.

Risk #4 – No Accountability:  A process for measuring progress toward goals and regular review meetings are the foundations for accountability. They enable the reasons for progress – or lack of it – to be assessed objectively. Those accountable can be recognized, paid bonuses, even promoted – or they may leave the company.

So I’m delighted that the main requirements for successfully executing a strategy, identified by the WSJ, are the same things we have been helping companies with for over 12 years.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy 5 Traits Effective Business Owners Share

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Risks 3 and 4 to Growth – And How To Avoid Them

Tuesday, June 24th, 2014

During the last 12 years we’ve worked with well over 100 companies ranging in size from less than $1 million to over $300 million in annual revenues. They were

  • In a variety of industries, from manufacturing to software development.
  • All at different stages in their lives, for example in some, growth had stalled, while others were growing quickly – too quickly.Risks 3 and 4 to business growth and how to avoid them

In a recent post, I talked about the 4 things we’ve done for the ones that we know, with the gift of hindsight, achieved the results they wanted.

Was their success solely attributable to what we did for them?

I can’t prove that. But I can say this, ignore these 4 things and you will not get the results you want and your company will not achieve its potential.

Last week, I talked about 2 of them – having a clear growth path and linking it to action – in some detail. Here are the other two.

3.  Get Buy In

How often have we seen a team of committed people do the apparently impossible?

When people participate in the development of the growth path and understand the role they must play in making it a reality, they become fully engaged in achieving the company’s goals.

Some of the things which make that happen are:

  • The owner and management team get representatives from across the company involved in building a picture of what the company will look like in 3 years time.
  • The picture, and annual goals, is communicated throughout the company – repeatedly.
  • Departmental and individual goals are linked to the company goals.
  • Progress toward goals and targets is communicated and updated continuously.

4.  Accountability For Results

Moving a company or division along a growth path involves identifying and completing a number of initiatives, made up of specific, measurable steps or actions.

The individual who has overall responsibility for each initiative and those involved in completing the steps, must be held accountable for the success or failure of their efforts.

This is achieved by:

  • Using a process – it can be a simple Excel spreadsheet or a sophisticated, cloud-based execution management system – to track the progress of each step.
  • Holding regular, quarterly meetings to review progress and adjust plans and budgets where necessary.
  • Reflecting every individual’s performance in their compensation, promotion – or even their continued employment with the company.

So how can you tell how well your company or division is doing all 4 things? I’ll tell you more about that next time.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Sustainable Growth – How To Achieve It

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

2 Risks To Business Growth – And How To Avoid Them

Tuesday, June 17th, 2014

We’ve worked with well over 100 companies since we started ProfitPATH.2 of the 4 risks that affect business growth and how to avoid them

A couple of posts ago, I commented that we did some, or all, of the same 4 things for the companies that achieved the results they wanted.

Was their success solely attributable to what we did for them? I can’t prove that with certainty.

But I can say this,

  • Ignore these 4 things and you will not get the results you want and your company will not achieve its potential. (That’s why we call them the 4 Risks.)
  • On the other hand, if a company deals with all 4 regularly, it will improve its results.

Here are the first 2 and some tips on how to deal with them.

1.  Have A Clear Growth Path

Having a clear growth path means having a picture of what you want your company to look like in 3 years’ time.

The best pictures are rich in detail and sharp in focus. In this case:

  • Detail comes from the depth of analysis that goes into building the picture.
  • Focus is a result of the choices that are made about the initiatives required to get there.

Using other language, this is your Vision, your Mission and your Strategy.

Bear in mind that we update photos of things we love – children, pets – as they grow and change. The same applies to a company.

2.  Link It To Action

The 3-year picture is what you desire. Turning it into reality takes action which yields results.

The key is to break what has to be achieved in 3 years into 3 sets of annual goals. Figuring out what has to be done in 12-month bites provides the flexibility to adapt as you learn more than you knew when you started out.

However, this requires a process and the discipline to use it every fiscal year.

  • Where must we be in 12 months? Where are we now? What’s the gap? How do we close it?
  • Prioritizing the list of “to do’s”; allocating resources to the high leverage items; and putting action plans in place to complete them.

This process drives the annual financial budgets – not the other way around.

I’ll touch on the other 2 Risks next time. For now, ask yourself this: “Where do you want your business to be in 3 years’ time?”  And, “What do you think you have to do to get there?”

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy A Vision – Is It Worth Investing The Time?

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Strategy – 3 Things To Argue About

Tuesday, May 13th, 2014

This morning, I gave my good friend Jeremy Miller some feedback about one of his blog posts.3 things to argue about strategy

Actually, I’m being polite. I told him where I disagreed with what he’d said.

The reason for the disagreement.

In his post Jeremy argued that:

  • Numeric goals, e.g. grow to $50 million in annual revenues in 5 years, lack meaning.
  • They – and SMART (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Time Related) goals – aren’t aspirational.
  • And they don’t engage people’s hearts; tell them why they should change their behaviors; or why their contributions matter.

Knowing how Jeremy thinks, this surprised me. However, as we talked I began to see his point of view.

Jeremy is a branding specialist.

Some of the companies he works with employ strategy consultants to help build their business strategy. And some of these consultants leave Jeremy’s clients having developed a strategy and set lofty goals.

Unfortunately, with everyone exhausted by the effort of developing the strategy, no thought is given to how to execute it.

And, to make matters worse, the only people to participate were the owner and management team.

Jeremy is left with the task of designing and implementing a marketing or branding program to achieve the goals.

His thinking is rooted in the frustration which arises when little or no thought has been given to how to translate a strategy into results.

“Strategy” has 2 parts.

That is because, I think, we’ve misused the word strategy for some time now.

Many people – consultants included – believe the job is done when a strategy has been developed. Let’s face it; most of the “models” in common use are designed to develop strategy.

It’s common knowledge that most companies fail at execution. Yet, ironically, there are far fewer “models” designed to guide the successful execution of a strategy.

The model we’ve been using, and improving, for 12 years now deals with both.

Yes, that is unashamed self-promotion.

But it’s also how I know that, if as many people as possible are involved in both developing a strategy and working out how it will be executed:

  • The meaning of numeric goals will be evident in the things a company intends to do.
  • Satisfying more customers, increasing profits and creating more jobs will become worthy aspirations.
  • Goals – numeric and SMART – will engage people’s hearts, explain why they should change their behaviors and why their contributions matter.

I’ll talk more about how the “strategy development only” model is broken – in future posts.

 

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy “You Can Achieve Any Result You Want To……”

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

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