Posts Tagged ‘initiatives’

Top Ten In 2014……

Monday, December 29th, 2014

The results are in!

Our top 10 blog posts in 2014 were:

1.   Adaptive Strategy – A Way To Profits In The New Normal? looks at an alternative strategy that is built on the 3 R’s (Responsiveness, Resilience, Readiness) required in a changing environment.

2.   6 Ways A Business Owner Can Influence Culture looks at the ways a business owner can develop a culture which will help increase operating profits and build shareholder value.

3.   6 Challenges Fast Growing Companies Face discusses the 6 challenges of execution which, if not dealt with, could prove fatal.

4.   3 Times When You May Need To Change Your Strategy explains when a company should review its strategy and what makes that review and any subsequent actions necessary.

5.   The Difference Between A Strategy And A Plan talks about the difference between strategy and planning and why it’s important to understand what these terms mean.

6.   6 Things We Can All Learn From Family-Owned Business puts forward 6 simple things business owners can implement to achieve better long-term financial performances.

7.  Use These 3 Tips To Make Your Next Critical Decision offers 3 things Ram Charan, co-author of “Execution”, says business leaders do when faced with a critical decision.

8.  5 Traits Effective Business Owners Share outlines some of the traits effective entrepreneurs have in common that contribute to the growth of their businesses.

9.  3 Reasons Why Consulting Assignments Fail and 3 Reasons Why Consulting Assignments Fail – Part 2 addresses the most common reasons why things can go wrong between consultants and their clients.

10. Strategic Planning – 3 Things That Are Wrong With It outlines how business owners make 3 mistakes that could destroy their company when they confuse strategy and strategic planning.

If you missed any of them, here’s another opportunity!

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Strategic Planning – 3 Things That Are Wrong With It

Tuesday, February 18th, 2014

We all know that picking a strategy means making choices.3 things wrong with strategic planning

But that means making guesses about that great unknown, the future. What happens then if we make the wrong choice? Could we destroy a company?

That’s why, according to Roger Martin¹, we turn choosing a strategy into a problem that can be solved using tools we are comfortable with.

And we call that strategic planning.

But, Martin says, companies make 3 mistakes when they confuse strategy and strategic planning.

1.  Putting the cart before the horse:

All strategic plans have 3 parts:

•  A vision or mission statement,
•  A list of initiatives required to achieve it,
•  The results of those initiatives expressed as financial statements.

These financials typically project 3 – 5 years into the future, making them “strategic” (although management typically focuses on only the first year’s numbers).

But the dominant logic in these plans, says Martin, is affordability; the plan consists of whichever initiatives fit the company’s resources. And that’s putting the cart before the horse.

2.  Relying on cost-based thinking:

The company is in control of its costs – it can, for example, decide how much office space it needs and how to promote its products.

And costs are known, or can be calculated, so fit easily into planning.

This thinking is extended to revenue forecasting and companies build detailed, internal forecasts by, for example, salesperson or product.

But these projections gloss over the fact that customers control revenue and that they decide how much a company gets.

3.  Basing strategy on what the company can control:

A number of well-known models are used for strategic planning. But they can be misused. Take Mintzberg’s concept of emergent strategy.

Martin believes it was intended to make business owners comfortable making adjustments to their deliberate strategy in response to changes emerging in the environment.

However, because waiting, and following what others are doing, is much safer than making hard choices and taking risks, emergent strategy has been hijacked to justify not making any strategic choices in the face of unpredictability.

But following competitors’ choices will never produce a unique or valuable advantage.

What do I think?

I like Martin’s views but the crux still lies in linking planning to execution, turning desire into results.

__________________________________
“The Big Lie of Strategic Planning”, Harvard Business Review, January 2014,
http://hbr.org/2014/01/the-big-lie-of-strategic-planning/ar/pr

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Bad Strategy – How To Spot It

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

The Difference Between A Strategy And A Plan

Tuesday, March 26th, 2013

Hang on a second, don’t tune out yet!

I’m not going to write a scholarly piece which will bore you to death.

I want to talk briefly about what I think is one of the worst mistakes – confusing strategy and planning. Roger Martin wrote a post for the HBR last month in which he dealt with this very topic.

I frequently hear business owners talk about the need to do “strategic planning” in order to create a “strategic plan”. Some talk – every year – about holding a “strategic planning meeting”.

But if you really are reinventing your strategy every year, isn’t that a bit of an indictment of both the strategy and the way it was developed?

Coming back to the meeting, the expectation is that the output from it will be a document, a plan. And that will contain a long list of initiatives (often referred to as strategies) with time frames for their completion.

Martin wonders how (and if) this “strategic plan” differs from a budget. I think that’s a great question. But I have a different one.

Isn’t this so called strategic planning meeting really an annual (business) planning meeting? That doesn’t make it any less important – because it still plays a key role in the execution of the company’s strategy.

And if that’s the case, shouldn’t we stop calling the output a “strategic” plan. And start calling it what it really is – the initiatives, which if completed in the next 12 months, will propel the company toward the achievement of its strategy.

Each initiative is accompanied by the Action Plans required to complete it. Each action plan has a champion who is accountable for it’s completion. The action plans have resources allocated to them. And they support, or even drive, the sales and margin forecast and expense budget.

Now let’s go back and talk about the company’s strategy for a moment.

Roger Martin puts it really well –

• “…we need to break free of this obsession with planning. Strategy is not planning…”

and then

• “…strategy is a singular thing; there is one strategy for a given business — not a set of strategies. It is one integrated set of choices….”

Choices about, for example, where and how a company will compete.

The strategy sets the context for the annual planning meeting. It should make it easy for the owner and her/his management team to decide which initiatives are relevant. (Assuming, of course, that they have already developed an effective strategy.)

I think the first step toward developing and executing business strategies that actually yield results is to stop misusing words.

If we call things by their real names we’ll stand a far better chance of understanding what they really are – or vice versa.

You can read Roger Martin blog post in full here.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Strategy – Don’t Think It, Experience It

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