Posts Tagged ‘People’

Avoiding Strategic Planning Failure

Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

This week’s guest is Leslie Heller, a management consultant focused on business strategy, change management and growth initiatives. He has 15 plus years in consulting and business leadership roles, where he led teams of over 1,200 employees, held accountability for over $850 MM in sales and $36 MM in payroll, and implemented growth initiatives in diverse business lines. Leslie’s motivation is to create an environment where businesses can implement change and deliver value for their customers. Leslie also volunteers as a mentor with Enterprise Toronto helping young people build businesses.

 

The strategic planning process is the time to develop corporate direction and vision that create value and excitement for companies and their stakeholders. This article highlights three points to include in the planning process that increase the chances of implementing a successful strategy. While no exhaustive list of what it takes to avoid strategic planning failure exists, these points will help planning at the team, project, division, business unit and company level.

1. Strategy and Execution

We often hear that “Strategies most often fail because they aren’t well executed”, but how “right” could the strategy have been if it failed in execution? If a strategy failed in execution it is likely that one or more of the following three points was missed in the strategic planning process:

i.     Ensuring the right skill-set is in place
ii.    Ensuring adequate resources are available
iii.   Ensuring processes to track, highlight and resolve issues throughout the project life-cycle are implemented

The ability to execute a strategy is part of strategic planning. When strategy ignores internal capabilities or does not address how capabilities will be addressed there is increased risk in delivering the strategic objectives. Spend the time to honestly assess internal capabilities upfront to avoid frustrating time-consuming issues later on.

2. Beware the Fouled Up System

In the article “On the Folly of Rewarding A While Hoping for B” (Steven Kerr, Academy of Management Journal, 1975, www.ou.edu/russell/UGcomp/Kerr.pdf), the author addresses how reward systems influence behaviour, and highlights examples where the behaviour does not align with the intent of the reward system. You likely have your own examples; for instance, when next years’ expense budget is based on current years’ spend, do all managers strive to find one-time (non-recurring) expense saving opportunities? How about if they are already surpassing their Plan… near year-end? Or consider performance metrics that measure attendance and productivity when a company really wants to measure employee engagement and quality. The down-stream impact of mistaking attendance for engagement or productivity for quality is increased customer support and rework that is often difficult to address, correlate and impact after the fact. Perhaps worst of all is the risk of setting strategy on misinterpreted business unit performance.

Selecting the right tracking metrics to influence employee behaviour within the strategic plan can be tricky and needs to be addressed, not only by strategy teams but by operational leaders who are more likely to identify disconnects between the intent of the reward system and the anticipated employee behaviour.

3. Change Management

Corporate strategies result in projects and projects result in change. Even positive change creates anxiety and needs to be managed (think about the last time you upgraded your corporate coffee system!). Change management is the act of using a structured process to lead the people side of change to increase the likelihood of project success.

According to Prosci, the world’s leading benchmarking research and change management product company, the top issues that derail change initiatives are ineffective project sponsorship, employee resistance to change and not using a structured change management approach. Change management has gained considerable attention lately and change management offices have popped up in banks and other institutions over the past few years. Including change as a topic in strategic planning, and then managing change with structured processes and communication plans should be built-in to the strategic planning process.

Summary

In summary, (i) ensuring executional capabilities are part of strategic planning, (ii) figuring out the best metrics to use to align employee behaviour to a new corporate direction, and (iii) using change management methodologies, will help your organization avoid strategic planning failure. Ensure that you include these on your strategic planning agenda!

For further information on avoiding strategic planning failure and change management you can reach Leslie Heller at lheller00@yahoo.com (Note: this is a summarized version of Leslie’s presentation at the 5th Annual Strategic Planning for Boards conference held in Toronto earlier this year.)

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ProfitPATH’s Top Ten Blogs – First Quarter 2015

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

Lessons about successful business growth1.  3 Lessons About Successful Business Growth

Two books, published 19 years apart, yet saying similar things about a key aspect of successful business growth:
‘Built To Last’ was published in 1994. In it, Jim Collins analyzed 18 companies that he called visionary because they were the best in their industries – and had been that way for decades. Collins argued that the core values and enduring purpose of all 18 could be separated from their operating practices and business strategies. And that, while the former never changed, the latter changed constantly in response to a changing world.
In her book ‘The End Of Competitive Advantage’, published in 2013, Rita Gunther McGrath studied the performance of large, publicly-traded companies from 2000-2009. She found that only 10 of them grew their net income by at least 5% every year. All 10 had found ways to combine tremendous internal stability with tremendous external flexibility. McGrath argues that to win in volatile and uncertain times, companies must learn to exploit short-lived opportunities quickly and decisively. more

time for a change in the direction you are heading, focus on center of compass...2.  3 Times When You May Need To Change Your Strategy

Changes to a well thought-out, well-crafted strategy shouldn’t be driven simply because it’s been in place 1, 3 or 5 years. A strategy shouldn’t necessarily be changed even if it isn’t producing results. In this situation I always look at how well (or badly) the strategy is being executed before I look at the strategy itself. So when should a company review its strategy? And what makes that review and any subsequent adaptation, revision or re-creation necessary? Here are three occasions. more

10 Commandments of Business Development3.  10 Commandments of Business Development

I’m not enjoying the after-effects of the 2007/2008 financial crisis. And I’m certainly not a fan of the banks, investment and other, which I believe were a significant contributor to the mess. But, while my wife may disagree, I like to think I keep an open mind. So when I saw an article talking about how Goldman Sachs grew from mid-tier firm to global player in a few decades I had to peek. John Whitehead, a co-head of the firm in 1970, wrote the following 10 commandments that guided their business development efforts. I love them. They’re full of common sense and they’re very practical. Written in 1970, these 10 commandments add to my belief that the basic, common sense principles of business never change. Here are 4 things that business owners today can take from them: more

4.  Adaptive Strategy – A Way To Profits In The New Normal?

Adaptive Strategy is an alternative developed by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG)¹. Here’s how I think it applies to owner managed businesses. Adaptive strategy is built on the 3 R’s required in a changing environment². Can adaptive strategy be applied in owner managed businesses? more

5.  6 Ways A Business Owner Can Influence Culture

I wrote last week about the relationship between Strategy, Culture and Leadership. As a result we’ve had some questions about how a business owner can influence the culture in his/her company. Here, in no particular priority, are 6 ways that it can be done. more

6.  The Difference Between A Strategy And A Plan

I want to talk briefly about what I think is one of the worst mistakes – confusing strategy and planning. Roger Martin wrote a post for the HBR last month in which he dealt with this very topic. I frequently hear business owners talk about the need to do “strategic planning” in order to create a “strategic plan”. Some talk – every year – about holding a “strategic planning meeting”. more

7.  6 Challenges Fast Growing Companies Face

I’ve mentioned Inc. magazine www.inc.com several times before. It’s a great resource. There’s a well-researched article in the current issue about 6 challenges fast growing companies face. They’re all about execution – and if the owner doesn’t deal with them well any one of them can be fatal. more

8.  6 Tips For Growing Your Business in 2015 – How to Use Them

I was asked a good question last week. “Loved your last blog post, Jim – but how do companies like mine do those things?” So here are some ways any business owner can implement the 6 tips in his/her company. more

9.  6 Tips For Growing Your Business in 2015

January is the month for New Year’s resolutions, freezing cold and, for many, a new fiscal year. Everyone wants to ‘do better’ in 2015 than in 2014 and, for business owners, ‘doing better’ is shorthand for growing. I don’t know how often, in the last couple of weeks, I’ve been asked something like “What are your top 6 tips for growing successfully”. The answer depends on a number of things. Here’s the rub. All 6 are much easier to talk about than do. But if you start on them now you can make some progress this year. more

10. 3 Reasons Why Strategy Isn’t Dead In The Water

I hate sweeping generalizations. Strategy is dead is one that I particularly dislike. To say that, it seems to me, is to say that it’s a complete waste of time for every company, regardless of size or industry, to have a strategy.
An article appeared in the Globe and Mail late last year, headline “Why Strategy is Dead In The Water.” It was based on an earlier article in Forbes magazine, headline “Is Strategy Dead? 7 Reasons The Answer May Be Yes.” We’d gone from strategy might be dead to signing its death certificate – in the space of two headlines. more

 

Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Get Results From Your Strategy Offsites

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

Holding a strategy offsite is like going to the dentist.Get results from strategy offsites with these tips

Doing it regularly should prevent unexpected pain and discomfort.

But going to the dentist is something that can be avoided. Why do it when everything’s going well, when it’s not necessary?

After all, a visit to the dentist can result in discomfort or even end badly.

It’s the same thing with a planning meeting.

It’s uncomfortable when, for example, people don’t want to get behind the business owner’s ‘stretch’ goals. And most people can look back on an offsite they attended and wonder why they bothered – because nothing changed.

So here are some things we’ve learned to ensure strategy offsites deliver results.

1.    Before the meeting

Set a realistic goal.

I ask clients to imagine we’re packing up after the last day of the offsite, and they’re feeling really good about what has been achieved.

Then I ask them what has to have happened for them to be feeling that way.

Sometimes, after they reply, we have to use our experience to illustrate what can, and can’t, be achieved in 1 or 2 days.

Distribute pre-work before the strategy offsite to maximize productivity in the time spent face-to-face. Any thinking that can be done in advance should be and any information required to make decisions should be distributed and studied.

2.    During the offsite

Keep people focused by:

• Announcing times for coffee and lunch breaks and insisting email and calls are dealt with then.

• Using a  ‘parking lot’ to record topics that are important, but not immediately relevant. Clear it at the end of each day.

Relieve the intensity of the discussions by using brainteasers and humorous video clips. Vary the pace, and make sure everyone’s thoughts are heard, by using sub-groups for some sessions.

Our process ends with the development of specific, measurable, time-related action plans to solve the problem that was the focus of the offsite.  Appoint Champions to coordinate the completion of the Plans.

This way everyone leaves with a sense of accomplishment and a clear plan of action.

3.    After the meeting

Capitalize on the momentum by holding regular, structured follow-up meetings.

Get everyone together at least once a quarter. Each Champion gives a progress report on his or her Action Plan and adjustments are made if necessary.

Take these tips and you’ll get results from your strategy offsites.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy What’s The Best Strategy – Grow The Core Or Expand?

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Purpose, People, Profits

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015

 

This week’s guest is Mark Lukens, a Founding Partner of Method3, a global management consulting firm, and Tack3, a business and non-profit consultancy. He has 20 plus years of C-Level experience across multiple sectors including healthcare, education, government, and people and potential (aka HR). Most of Mark’s writing involves theoretical considerations and practical applications, academics, change leadership, and other topics at the intersection of business, society, and humanity.

 

In the 1980s we were told that profit was king. The whole economy was restructured to put this focus before all else, on the basis that if we did that right then everything else would follow. But the reality is very different. Profit itself follows from putting a sense of wider purpose first, and from looking after people in the way that such a purpose ensures.

Purpose

To put profit first is to let someone else set our direction. It is to act as if we have no choice, when what we are really doing is choosing the easiest path, the one that makes us least distinctive.

But taking the immediate easiest path is never taking the most beneficial path in the long term, because so many others are following the same path, all fighting for scraps of the same short-term benefits. This creates situations like the current housing market, which creates financial bubbles rather than new housing for those who most need it, even though a different path could solve the shortage in less than a generation.

If you want to create something that stands out, something that endures, then first you have to choose your path, not let the market choose it for you, whether that purpose is social housing, radical design or an alternative approach to cloud solutions. Start with what you want to achieve.

People

An organization with a sense of purpose will naturally end up serving the people who share that sense of purpose, as innovations to assist that cause also assist them.

Improvements to the battery life of the Tesla Roadster provide an example of this. The company wants to provide more efficient environmentally friendly ways to drive, and their customers want the same thing. As they achieve improvements to this technology, like a battery that can go further between charges, they come closer to their aim of better environmentally friendly cars, while also providing a better service to the people driving those cars. Over time, this will increase the number of people using their products, through better service and value for money.

Tesla Motors are no mere novelty. They are a company on the rise, financially and in terms of profile. That rise comes from serving a purpose, and so serving people.

Profits

Across the globe, there are signs that a sense of purpose can lead companies to profit by better serving people.

Like Tesla Motors or Woetzel, Mischke and Ram’s schemes for a better housing market, the Fairtrade movement finds it purpose in a grand cause, aiming to provide a better income for poor third world producers. This directly puts people first, and has led to profit for organizations large and small, from African mango growers to London boutique shops.

But a purpose doesn’t need to be political or social to benefit a company. Apple’s sense of purpose has long been built around providing technological innovation and user-friendly products. This has provided customers with products they never knew that they wanted but now can’t live without, such as the iPhone, and a design aesthetic that has a huge cult-like following. Their strong sense of purpose has provided for people, and ultimately for huge profits.

PPP

Putting purpose first is about recognizing that profit is not an end in itself, but a way of supporting companies and those who invest in them. If your purpose is something that people value then those people will naturally be served by your work, and profit will flow from that.

It’s not about ignoring profit. It’s about putting purpose first.

You can reach Mark at marklukens@gmail.com or visit his website at http://www.marklukens.com

Your Company, Your House

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015

I heard a wonderful metaphor a couple of weeks ago.To grow your business, think of your company as a house

Think of your company as a house.

The functional areas or departments – for example sales, marketing, operations, HR and finance – each represent a room in the house.

You can’t have a house without rooms and rooms have no purpose on their own. A house is not a home if it’s just a bunch of rooms.

The construction materials with which your house is built are, for example, peoples’ skills and experience; processes that enable the areas to function effectively; IT systems that provide data to manage performance.

Your culture is the mortar holding your house together.

What happens when we decide we want to grow? After all, as business owners, our main – if not sole – focus is on growth.

Growth can be achieved in 2 ways. By making one or more rooms in your existing house larger or by designing and building a bigger house.

1.  Making one or more rooms bigger

You can do this by, for example, adding more sales people to bring in more orders, or by launching a marketing campaign to generate more leads.

But making one room in a house bigger puts pressure on the other rooms. That has consequences. If you don’t believe me, try making one of your children’s bedrooms larger while making another one’s smaller.

As one room or area grows, everything else is forced out of proportion. You may even put pressure on the structure of the house and cracks will appear as the bricks and mortar strain to hold everything together.

A couple of examples of the business equivalent are tight cash flow, an increasing backlog of orders or losing good people.

2.  Designing and building a bigger house

Design and build a larger house and you grow, while structurally keeping everything in proportion.

How does this apply to your Company?

Designing and building a bigger house is equivalent to developing and executing a business strategy.

Each of the functions, or rooms, still has its own strategy. But they work in the context of, and by supporting, the strategy for the entire house/business.

If you involve your team in the design, the end product will be better and they’ll be more committed to getting it built.

I like this metaphor. What do you think?

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Sustainable Growth – How To Achieve It

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

6 Tips For Growing Your Business in 2015

Tuesday, January 13th, 2015

January is the month for New Year’s resolutions, freezing cold and, for many, a new fiscal year.Tips to successfully grow your business in 2015

Everyone wants to ‘do better’ in 2015 than in 2014 and, for business owners, ‘doing better’ is shorthand for growing.

I don’t know how often, in the last couple of weeks, I’ve been asked something like “What are your top 6 tips for growing successfully”.

The answer depends on a number of things.

That said here are some of the things that the companies I’ve seen grow successfully have in common.

Those companies are:

1.  Very willing to try new things (innovate, adapt). However they don’t bet the farm. They do limited scale tests of new products and ways of doing things first. Ones that work are rolled out quickly; ones that don’t are killed – just as quickly.

2.  Always trying to be better – than themselves. They are continually looking for ways to, for example, improve their own quality, do things more quickly and become more efficient. They don’t compare themselves to others, they just want to the best they can be.

3.  Following a strategy or plan. They know where they want to be in 3 – 5 years but don’t expect to get there by following a straight line. They try to keep growing steadily in good times and in bad.

4.  Skilled at turning their plan into results. Knowing what success will look like makes it easier for them to set priorities and allocate the resources and funds to achieve them. They link every individual and every department’s work to the company’s goals and hold themselves accountable.

5.  Able to spot trends earlier than most of their competitors. They stay close to their customers and suppliers, monitor their competitors and watch for developments in technology.

6.  Working from a solid foundation. All of their core business processes – sales, marketing, operations, finance and HR – are tried, tested and automated wherever possible. They find, hire and retain smart people who are a good “fit” with their culture and values. They are fiscally cautious, never over extend themselves and can fund their growth.

Here’s the rub. All 6 are much easier to talk about than do.

But if you start on them now you can make some progress this year. And if you need some help just give us a call…….

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy 3 Leadership Tips From A Great Scotsman

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Top Ten In 2014……

Monday, December 29th, 2014

The results are in!

Our top 10 blog posts in 2014 were:

1.   Adaptive Strategy – A Way To Profits In The New Normal? looks at an alternative strategy that is built on the 3 R’s (Responsiveness, Resilience, Readiness) required in a changing environment.

2.   6 Ways A Business Owner Can Influence Culture looks at the ways a business owner can develop a culture which will help increase operating profits and build shareholder value.

3.   6 Challenges Fast Growing Companies Face discusses the 6 challenges of execution which, if not dealt with, could prove fatal.

4.   3 Times When You May Need To Change Your Strategy explains when a company should review its strategy and what makes that review and any subsequent actions necessary.

5.   The Difference Between A Strategy And A Plan talks about the difference between strategy and planning and why it’s important to understand what these terms mean.

6.   6 Things We Can All Learn From Family-Owned Business puts forward 6 simple things business owners can implement to achieve better long-term financial performances.

7.  Use These 3 Tips To Make Your Next Critical Decision offers 3 things Ram Charan, co-author of “Execution”, says business leaders do when faced with a critical decision.

8.  5 Traits Effective Business Owners Share outlines some of the traits effective entrepreneurs have in common that contribute to the growth of their businesses.

9.  3 Reasons Why Consulting Assignments Fail and 3 Reasons Why Consulting Assignments Fail – Part 2 addresses the most common reasons why things can go wrong between consultants and their clients.

10. Strategic Planning – 3 Things That Are Wrong With It outlines how business owners make 3 mistakes that could destroy their company when they confuse strategy and strategic planning.

If you missed any of them, here’s another opportunity!

Can Strategic Planning Pay Off?

Tuesday, November 18th, 2014

“The most fundamental weakness of most corporate plans today is that they do not lead to the major decisions that must be made currently to ensure the success of the enterprise in the future.”Key factors to make strategic planning pay off

It sounds like something I might have written in one of my blog posts because the point applies equally to owner-managed businesses.

But, regrettably, it wasn’t.

It’s from an article written by a 31-year-old, who then goes on to say:

“…..Nothing really new happens as a result of the plan, except that everyone gets a warm glow of security and satisfaction now that the uncertainty of the future has been contained……”

Does that sound familiar? The author goes on to say:

“……too many managements fail to…….recognize that the end product of strategic analysis should not be plans but current decisions.”

He then lists the reasons why decisions aren’t made:

• It’s risky – a bad decision could jeopardize the company.

• It’s difficult – “Strategic planning….deals with the most complex questions facing a company……synthesizing critical issues and strategic options to resolve those issues….is fundamentally a creative process. Many…..find it an elusive, uncomfortable task.”

• It requires leadership – making controversial decisions requires a willingness to be tough-minded.

• The value system works against it – owners often emphasize short-term results, which have little to do with long-term strategic success.

Next the author points out that “Many planning systems simply….produce forecasts of financial results, or statements of objectives”.

This is “….momentum” planning as opposed to dynamic planning that is attuned to the realities of external change……..

To deal with this, emphasis must be given to 3 things – evaluating the external environment; thorough evaluation of competitive strategies; and developing contingency plans.

Finally, the author provides 2 recommendations for motivating the people who can make or break a strategy. Involve those who will actually have to execute the strategy and adapt reward systems to recognize longer-term performance and the achievement of strategic goals.

So, which of today’s leading thinkers wrote the article? None of them did.

An up-and-coming member of the McKinsey team called Lou Gerstner (of IBM fame) wrote the article in 1973.

I like the article because it addresses all 4 of the Risks we believe growing companies face – having a Clear Growth Plan; linking it to Action; getting Buy In and holding people Accountable.

You can find the full article here.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Strategic Planning – 3 Things That Are Wrong With It

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

7 Ways to Hold Consultants Accountable Now

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

7 ways to hold consultants accountable nowMy wife will tell you I like giving other people advice.

That’s probably why I’m a management consultant.

But even consultants have to take some of their own advice – and change in order to grow.

For example, we must find a process for linking our compensation to our results in a meaningful way.

There’s no doubt this is hard to do. But that’s no excuse for refusing to try.

However, at the risk of making a huge understatement, it’s going to take time.

So, while we’re waiting, what can a business owner do to make sure the consultants they hire actually deliver results?

1. I talked about our own solution to linking compensation to results last year in a post called “Let’s Hold Consultants Responsible For Results”. It isn’t perfect, but it’s better than the traditional model.

2. Four years ago I suggested how owners can keep control when they work with consultants.

3. Around the same time I highlighted 3 reasons why consulting engagements fail. It’s really not difficult to avoid making them.

4. Look for consultants who have had practical, “hands on” experience operating a company. They have 2 clear advantages over consultants who have spent their entire career in consulting roles, as I pointed out in 2011.

5. There are also clues that you can listen for. Consultants who are effective tend to say certain things.

Here are 2 more things that I thought about this week.

6. Yesterday I was talking to a business owner who had been referred by an existing client. He asked if I would go out and meet him. I agreed immediately because that’s the only way to determine if there’s any chemistry between us.

Some people might consider the idea of “chemistry” to be foolish. But I can tell you from experience, that without it, the risk of a project failing increases dramatically.

7. Ask what success will look like. It’s more than just a description of what the consultant’s going to do and the services they’ll deliver. It’s about knowing how, when and what they will do to help you get the results you want.

Success, they say, comes not from doing one big thing well, but from doing many little things well. Perhaps change is like that too.

We at ProfitPATH, and lots of other consultants, are chipping away, doing the necessary things that will bring change to our business.

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Jim StewartJim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

One Big Reason Why Strategies Fail

Tuesday, September 9th, 2014

the main reason a strategy fails is based in how it’s executedI often argue that a strategy isn’t important.

It’s the benefits a strategy delivers – more profit, increasing the value of a company – that are important. They put more money in the owner’s pocket.

To reap those benefits the strategy must, of course, be successful.

A strategy can fail for many reasons.

It could just be a lousy strategy. But that happens less often than you might think.

Even a poorly conceived strategy can deliver results – if it’s executed with focus, energy and passion.

I believe the main reason a strategy fails is based in how it’s executed.

For example:

  • There’s no link between the strategy and the actions which have to be completed if it’s to be successful.
  • Most people don’t know what the strategy is – and the part their job has to play in making it successful.
  • People, at all levels, do know what their role is – but there’s no accountability if they miss targets.

Some examples are less evident.

One in particular is quite insidious. It goes like this.

After intense discussion, the owner and management team reach a consensus on the strategy for the next 3 years. Everyone goes off determined to do the right things to execute it successfully.

However, since much of their time is taken up with running the business day-to-day, after a while, that begins to affect their perspective.

And that gradual, subtle change in perspective can have a major impact on the execution of their strategy.

It is possible to detect it and fix it. But that requires the discipline to do 2 things.

First, hold regular strategy review meetings. Second, keep the agenda off day-to-day stuff, and on measuring progress toward the 3-year goal.

Any shift in perspective can be spotted by asking one question. “Are all of the projects being discussed integrated/aligned with the strategy we chose for the next 3 years?”

The odds are there will be some drift.

That’s because the company is made up of people. And people tend to have their own priorities, concerns, agenda, and goals – which may be directly opposed to the next person’s. In the face of day-to-day pressures, people find it hard to keep the whole company perspective in mind.

But it can be restored – and one big reason why execution fails can be easily avoided.

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Strategy Execution – How You Do What You Do

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Jim StewartJim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

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