Posts Tagged ‘Planning’

Recommended Reading – Winter 2014

Tuesday, November 11th, 2014

Hello, winter!  Snowflakes are dancing on the air and covering the land in a wardrobe of white.  A touch of arctic air is pinching our noses and cheeks.  Time to get comfortable and pick up a good book. Here are some of the personal favourites we’ve selected from the various “best books in 2014” lists published recently on 800ceo read’s blog:

Drawing upon a six-year research project at the Stanford University Graduate School of Business, James C. Collins and Jerry I. Porras took eighteen truly exceptional and long-lasting companies and studied each in direct comparison to one of its top competitors. They examined the companies from their very beginnings to the present day — as start-ups, as mid-size companies, and as large corporations. Throughout, the authors asked: “What makes the truly exceptional companies different from the comparison companies and what were the common practices these enduringly great companies followed throughout their history?” Filled with hundreds of specific examples and organized into a coherent framework of practical concepts that can be applied by managers and entrepreneurs at all levels, Built to Last provides a master blueprint for building organizations that will prosper long into the 21st century and beyond.

Obviously, there are lots of things that matter now. But in a world of fractured certainties and battered trust, some things matter more than others. While the challenges facing organizations are limitless; leadership bandwidth isn’t. That’s why you have to be clear about what really matters now. What are the fundamental, make-or-break issues that will determine whether your organization thrives or dives in the years ahead? Hamel identifies five issues are that are paramount: values, innovation, adaptability, passion and ideology. In doing so he presents an essential agenda for leaders everywhere who are eager to…move from defense to offense, reverse the tide of commoditization, defeat bureaucracy, astonish their customers, foster extraordinary contribution, capture the moral high ground, outrun change, build a company that’s truly fit for the future. Concise and to the point, “What Matters Now” will inspire you to rethink your business, your company and how you lead.

A guide for protecting your wealth in an age of turbulent business cycles. In “Prosperity in the Age of Decline”, Brian and Alan Beaulieu offer an informed, meticulously-researched look at the future and the coming Great Depression.

Surprisingly, most companies fail not because demand is low or conditions are difficult, but simply because they don’t know how to manage, nurture, or even maintain their own growth and success. At each developmental stage, they become vulnerable to chaos, no matter how strong or expert their leaders. Most leaders feel a sense of isolation, assuming they have to know it all and end up making critical mistakes. Dando calls these critical mistakes the 12 Warning Signs of Success, and he helps leaders across industries identify, anticipate, and avoid them on the way from startup to Fortune 500. Maybe you’ve hired the wrong person, have too many direct reports, or say yes to everything; you might believe your own hype, incentivize failure, or lose track of your core values. Dando, known in leadership circles as the Company Whisperer, encountered all the same challenges as a C-level executive in a high-growth billion-dollar business, and he knows that these moments of truth determine whether the leader and the company become a strong, mature, and sustainable organization, or drift toward an uncertain future.

If you’re aiming to innovate, failure along the way is a given. But can you fail “better”? Whether you’re rolling out a new product from a city-view office or rolling up your sleeves to deliver a social service in the field, learning why and how to embrace failure can help you do better, faster. Smart leaders, entrepreneurs, and change agents design their innovation projects with a key idea in mind: “ensure that every failure is maximally useful. In “Fail Better”, Anjali Sastry and Kara Penn show how to create the conditions, culture, and habits to systematically, ruthlessly, and quickly figure out what works, in three steps:
1. Launch every innovation project with the right groundwork
2. Build and refine ideas and products through iterative action
3. Identify and embed the learning
You may be a “Fortune” 500 manager, scrappy start-up innovator, social impact visionary, or simply leading your own small project. If you aim to break through without breaking the bank–or ruining your reputation—“Fail Better” is for you.

An insider’s look at how a successful leadership pipeline can make or break a company Starting out at GE, where he headed up the company’s leadership institute and revamped the leadership pipeline under Jack Welch, Noel Tichy has served as a trusted advisor on management succession to such leading companies as Royal Dutch Shell, Nokia, Intel, Ford, Mercedes-Benz, Merck and Caterpillar. Now Tichy draws on decades of hands-on experience working with CEOs and boards to provide a framework for building a smart, effective transition pipeline, whether for a multi-billion dollar conglomerate, a family business, a small start-up, or a non-profit. Through revealing case studies like Hewlett Packard, IBM, Yahoo, P&G, Intel, and J.C. Penney, he examines why some companies fail and others succeed in training and sustaining the next generation of senior leaders. He highlights the common mistakes that can generate embarrassing headlines and may even call an organization’s survival into question, and reveals the best practices of those who got it right. Tichy also positions leadership talent development and succession where they belong: at the top of every leader’s agenda.

The market for business knowledge is booming as companies looking to improve their performance pour millions of dollars into training programmes, consultants, and executive education. Why then, are there so many gaps between what firms know they should do and what they actual do? This volume confronts the challenge of turning knowledge about how to improve performance into actions that produce measurable results. The authors identify the causes of this gap and explain how to close it.

According to a study published in “Chief Executive Magazine,” the most valued skill in leaders today is strategic thinking. However, more than half of all companies say that strategic thinking is the skill their senior leaders most need to improve. “Elevate” provides leaders with a framework and toolkit for developing “advanced” strategic thinking capabilities. Unlike the majority of books that focus on strategy from a corporate perspective, “Elevate” gives the individual executive practical tools and techniques to help them become a truly strategic leader. The new framework that will enable leaders to finally integrate both strategy and innovation into a strategic
approach that drives their profitable growth is the Three Disciplines of “Advanced” Strategic Thinking:
1. Coalesce: Fusing together insights to create an innovative business model.
2. Compete: Creating a system of strategy to achieve competitive advantage.
3. Champion: Leading others to think and act strategically to execute strategy.
Every leader desperately wants to be strategic – their career depends on it. “Elevate” provides the roadmap to reach the strategic leadership summit.

“Escape Velocity” offers a pragmatic plan to engage the most critical challenge that established enterprises face in the twenty-first-century economy: how to move beyond past success and drive next-generation growth from new lines of business.
As he worked with senior management teams, Moore repeatedly found that executives were trapped by short-term performance-based compensation schemes. The result was critical decision-makers overweighting their legacy commitments, an embarrassingly low success rate in new-product launches, and a widespread failure to sustain any kind of next-generation business at scale.
In “Escape Velocity”, Moore presents a cogent strategy for generating future growth within an established enterprise. Organized around a hierarchy of powers: category power, company power, market power, offer power, and execution power, this insightful work shows how each level of power can be orchestrated to achieve overall success.

In this work, noted consultant Erika Andersen helps the reader approach business and life strategically, explaining why it is important, what’s involved in doing it, and how to do it. 

For a full listing of best books in 2014, please visit http://800ceoread.com/

 

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

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Strategy, Motherhood, The Dog and Its Tail

Tuesday, November 4th, 2014

Do you remember that old expression “The tail’s wagging the dog”?The tail's wagging the dog or, the process is more important than the result

It was used to describe situations in which, for example, a process for doing something takes on more importance than the result it produces.

Why did I think of that now?

Simply, for many companies, this is the time of year in which they begin their strategic or business planning.

This process is often viewed as unproductive, frustrating, even pointless or a waste of time. So it may not be welcomed with enthusiasm.

Why is that?

After 13 years of working with business owners and their teams, I have a few ideas:

1.  Strategy development is a difficult, creative, iterative activity. But in many organizations the ‘planning’ process has to be completed in a predetermined period of time, in the same month or quarter, every year. That’s the tail wagging the dog.

2.  We use terms like strategic planning, business planning, and even budgeting, interchangeably as if they all refer to the same thing. They don’t.

  • Strategy development involves making well thought out choices about the future.
  • Business planning is about the activities that have to be completed in the next 12 months to execute the strategy.
  • Budgeting is estimating the financial outcomes of the activities in the annual business plan.

3.  If we’re not clear about what we’re setting out to do, everyone will expect a different outcome and no one will end up getting the result they wanted.

4.  Worse, the results we do get may not be useful. By trying to do more than one thing at a time, we end up doing none of them well. The result is a breathtaking series of ‘motherhood’ statements that are neither a strategy nor focused action plans.

5.  We begin the process with a budget, the financial targets the owner wants to achieve, and make the ‘strategy’ fit those. That, to use another metaphor, is putting the cart before the horse.

6.  Even if the results are useful, we don’t follow up. We are so busy dealing with day-to-day challenges there is simply no time. In reality, we lack discipline – not time.

Is it surprising that many business owners, executives, managers and employees are cynical about ‘planning’?

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Strategy and Planning – How Business Owners Think

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Good Strategy Execution Pays Off

Tuesday, October 28th, 2014

I’ve believed for many years that how a company executes its strategy is more important than how it develops the strategy.Good strategy execution pays off well when you focus on these 7 key capabilities

I’m talking about the business strategy, the one that deals with all parts, departments or functions of a company.

My point could also apply to departmental or specific strategies; for example, sales or marketing strategies, since theoretically, these all flow from the business strategy and are integrated with it.

Previously, I’ve never had any evidence to support my belief since common sense, apparently, does not qualify as evidence.

No more.

Earlier this year, no less an authority than McKinsey & Company¹ gave me evidentiary support for my arguments.

They used their Implementation Capability Assessment to separate companies that are good at execution from those that aren’t. The survey then found that good implementers:

  • Maintain twice the value from their prioritized opportunities after 2 years.
  • Score their companies 30% higher on a series of financial performance indicators.

So there! Executing well pays off – literally.

How do you know if your company is a good implementer or a poor implementer?

McKinsey identified 7 key capabilities for executing well. Every company may have them to some extent. Yet businesses which are good at execution, are almost twice as good at them.

The 7 capabilities are:

  1. Ownership and commitment to execution at all levels of the company.
  2. Focus on a set of priorities.
  3. Clear accountability for specific actions.
  4. Effective management of execution using common tools.
  5. Planning for long-term commitment to execution.
  6. Continuous improvement during execution and rapid reaction to amend plans as required.
  7. Allocation of adequate resources and capabilities.

Finally, here’s the good news. Good implementers believe that execution is an individual discipline, which can be improved over time.

Does this confirm my belief that how a company executes its strategy is more important than how it develops the strategy?

Partially. More importantly, it does demonstrate that time spent improving a company’s ability to execute is time well invested.

As for the comparison to developing a strategy – I’ll just have to keep on looking.

______________________________________
¹ “Why Implementation Matters”, McKinsey & Company Insights, August 2014

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy To Grow or Not To Grow – That Is The Question

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

How Do You Know If Your Company Will Fail?

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

Let me go back almost 20 years to give you some context.How do business owners know if their company is on the path to decline?

My last real job (that’s what my wife calls the jobs I had before I became a consultant) was running the Canadian subsidiary of a 100-year-old, multi-national corporation.

Our owners, a much larger, publicly listed corporation, had bought us years before as a ‘cash cow’. There was, therefore, very limited investment in any aspect of the operations.

When I joined, the core business was rapidly being replaced by a new technology. We developed a new strategy for Canada and quickly set about executing it.

But, even when we appeared to be having some success with the new strategy, I used to ask myself if it was already too late – and how I would know if it was.

Now let’s return to the present day.

I’m re-reading Jim Collins’ book “How The Mighty Fall”. It was written as a result of a CEO asking how he would know if his company, successful as it had been, was already on the path to decline.

Imagine me asking the same question as the CEO of one of America’s most successful companies – several years before he asked it. It would indeed be remarkable, were it not for a few important details.

Clearly the circumstances were different. The CEO was being more farsighted than my employers had been.

And, more importantly, I’ll bet that many business owners have worried – and still worry – over the same question. I’m sure they started long before I asked it and some are still asking it now.

So why even raise the topic?

For one thing, if Collins’ book had been available in the mid-1990s, I would have had my answer. I would have known that, in time, the company would be sold to a competitor and, when that didn’t work, be absorbed by another competitor and almost completely disappear.

For another, “How The Mighty Fall” should be mandatory reading for all business owners. Or at least for those who understand that their past successes offer no guarantee, or even protection, for the future.

One point that caught my attention – and I’m only on page 48 – is that complacency was responsible for only one of the failed companies.

Another is that being an innovator was no protection from failure.

I would have assumed the opposite in both cases. So, perhaps I’m not as far ahead as I thought…………

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Targets Are Targets, Results Are Reality

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Knowing and Doing – The Difference Affects Results

Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

There are advantages to getting older.Knowing the right thing to do and doing it to get results

Knowing the right thing to do.

One is you realize that to be successful, you only have to apply a few simple principles, most of which contain an element of common sense.

Another is that you learn that applying those principles is surprisingly difficult to do.

This last pearl of hard-earned wisdom helps when I read articles and posts about ways to improve business results, that we’ve known about for years.

It prevents me from becoming cynical – even when the authors package them as a new breakthrough that only they were capable of making.

Why is that?

It’s because I know that we – owners, executives, and even consultants – are constantly blind-sided by the day-to-day pressures of running a business. And that makes us lose sight of these fundamentally simple, common sense concepts.

So there’s a real benefit to having them repeated.

Doing the right thing.

Someone much smarter than I am once said “Knowing the right thing to do isn’t difficult. Doing the right thing is what’s difficult.”

I know that’s true.

We work every day with business owners and their teams who often know what to do to be successful (they have a good strategy) but who have difficulty actually doing those things (executing their strategy).

We’re no smarter than they are.

But we have the benefit of being able to focus on linking their strategy to action, helping them get buy-in throughout their organization and then holding them accountable for doing what they said they would.

No distractions for us.

Staying focused on a manageable number of activities which will have a high impact on the future and produce a high return on the resources invested in them, produces good business results.

No surprises there, right?

I could have used a bunch of big words to make the same point.

Or I could have proclaimed this was a new technique that would guarantee results.

But it’s not. It’s wisdom that’s been well proven over time.

Something, however, that bears repeating by a third party that, because of their perspective, can see woods without being blinded by the trees.

It’s worth thinking about as many of us head into annual business planning season.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy A Lesson in Strategy Execution from a Successful Business Owner

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

7 Ways to Hold Consultants Accountable Now

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

7 ways to hold consultants accountable nowMy wife will tell you I like giving other people advice.

That’s probably why I’m a management consultant.

But even consultants have to take some of their own advice – and change in order to grow.

For example, we must find a process for linking our compensation to our results in a meaningful way.

There’s no doubt this is hard to do. But that’s no excuse for refusing to try.

However, at the risk of making a huge understatement, it’s going to take time.

So, while we’re waiting, what can a business owner do to make sure the consultants they hire actually deliver results?

1. I talked about our own solution to linking compensation to results last year in a post called “Let’s Hold Consultants Responsible For Results”. It isn’t perfect, but it’s better than the traditional model.

2. Four years ago I suggested how owners can keep control when they work with consultants.

3. Around the same time I highlighted 3 reasons why consulting engagements fail. It’s really not difficult to avoid making them.

4. Look for consultants who have had practical, “hands on” experience operating a company. They have 2 clear advantages over consultants who have spent their entire career in consulting roles, as I pointed out in 2011.

5. There are also clues that you can listen for. Consultants who are effective tend to say certain things.

Here are 2 more things that I thought about this week.

6. Yesterday I was talking to a business owner who had been referred by an existing client. He asked if I would go out and meet him. I agreed immediately because that’s the only way to determine if there’s any chemistry between us.

Some people might consider the idea of “chemistry” to be foolish. But I can tell you from experience, that without it, the risk of a project failing increases dramatically.

7. Ask what success will look like. It’s more than just a description of what the consultant’s going to do and the services they’ll deliver. It’s about knowing how, when and what they will do to help you get the results you want.

Success, they say, comes not from doing one big thing well, but from doing many little things well. Perhaps change is like that too.

We at ProfitPATH, and lots of other consultants, are chipping away, doing the necessary things that will bring change to our business.

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Jim StewartJim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

3 Growth Strategies That Always Work

Tuesday, September 2nd, 2014

Here are 3 strategies that work for privately owned businesses in any economic conditions.

3 strategies that work for privately-owned businesses in any economic conditions

Guaranteed.

I’m going to be really bold and also say they will work in any industry.

Interested?

1. Keep costs down – but quality up.

Twenty small and medium-sized companies, based in the U.K., managed high growth by keeping their production costs under control and their prices competitive.

Even when the economy slumped, they kept their quality up even though that meant their prices were slightly higher than their competitors.

That way they kept their customers satisfied – and avoided price wars.

2. Differentiate on tangibles – not intangibles.

Thirteen of the companies were consistent innovators, regularly introducing new products, services or processes.

Five of them, all manufacturers, consistently allocated a large percentage of revenues to developing new products.

In contrast, 15 of the 20 spent relatively little on traditional marketing activities, using their sales force and the Internet to keep customers up-to-date on their new products or services.

3. Customization.

Almost half of the companies stayed very closely in touch with their customers, delivering solutions tailored to specific needs and adapting products as needs changed.

Even those who produced standardized products invited small changes or provided complementary services.

Flouting conventional wisdom, 75% of the companies spurned niches for the broader market. They took time to figure out their competitors’ strengths and weaknesses, then exploited their knowledge to increase their market share.

The 20 companies in the study grew at a consistent rate over a 4-year period—outpacing their competitors by more than 50 percent while operating in declining industries – for example, the clothing industry.

Think about it – keep your costs under control; understand what your customers need, and then give it to them; introduce new products and services regularly.

Put that way it almost sounds like common sense.

So, if these approaches work in a tight economy or mature markets, why wouldn’t they work in good times and healthy markets?

The short answer is that they will.

I’ll make 2 more points as a wrap up.

  • These 3 approaches aren’t mutually exclusive. In fact, the British companies used a combination of them – usually the second and third.
  • The authors of the study commented that the owners and managers saw the situation as offering a challenge and lots of opportunities. As they say – attitude is everything.

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy The Keys to Executing a Strategy and Getting Results.

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Jim StewartJim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

 

Strategy And The Sales Force

Tuesday, August 26th, 2014

“It’s as plain as the nose on your face!”Funny glasses

One of my aunts used to say that when one of us kids overlooked something by not looking at a situation in a complete way. We saw the obvious – but missed the subtle message.

I was reminded of that yesterday.

I was reading about how, in the mid-1990s, Xerox missed an underlying technological change taking place in their industry.

The sales force was focused on maintaining market share in the face of lower cost competitors like Canon.

But, even though they were visiting companies every day, they missed the fact that people were beginning to use PCs and printers to produce copies.

How did this happen? How could something, so evident in retrospect, have been missed?

One answer is that sales and strategy are separate worlds, often disconnected from each other.

No doubt that’s true. But it’s not just a process or functional issue.

Before becoming a CEO, I spent time in sales and then managed sales forces.

I also worked in companies which had entrenched positions in their industries and which failed to respond to structural shifts.

So here’s my question. Even if the sale force had spotted the change, would anyone have listened to them?

Market dominance can breed a culture in which owners and management develop the belief that they can do no wrong. Their attitude is…….

We’re doing what we’ve always done and that’s resulted in success for many years now. If growth slows or sales actually decrease, that must be because the sales force have stopped being effective.

Instead of complaining about products not having enough features or prices being too high, the sales people need to focus on making calls. What’s needed is a sales training program. And if that doesn’t work, then we’ll replace a few of them.

If things still don’t turn around, we’ll have a look at our marketing programs.

By which they really mean the promotional programs, if any, because they’ve forgotten that marketing also includes pricing and product strategies.

I was on the receiving end of attitudes like these when I worked in corporations.

And, in the last 13 years, we’ve worked with many privately owned companies after sales training and marketing programs failed to restart growth.

So, before reaching for the process or functional solutions, take a moment to check the culture and attitudes. However improbable, that might lead to the answer.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Is Crushing the Competition a Strategy?

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Jim StewartJim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Is “Crushing The Competition” A Strategy?

Tuesday, July 22nd, 2014

Saying you’re going to crush the competition may provide the emotional fire to drive a sales team to beat its short-term revenue targets.It is possible to win without crushing the competition.

But as a strategy for the whole business, it’s not only ineffective, it’s dangerous.

Here’s why.

1.  It puts the focus in the wrong place.

A successful strategy focuses on customer needs; the value proposition with which the company satisfies those needs; and the resources and capabilities required to deliver it.

Trying to crush the competition puts the focus on doing things “better” than they do.

It puts competitors, not customers, front and centre. It substitutes action based on original thinking, with reaction to someone else’s thinking.

2.  It sacrifices the long term for the short term.

Two common tactics for crushing the competition are providing more features for the same price and cutting prices.

However neither of them creates new value for customers, nor do they help the company’s long-term margins.

Businesses reap the biggest rewards when their strategies provide previously unrealized value for consumers and users by, for example, introducing new, or enhanced, products or services.

That, however, takes time and the willingness to take risk. It may also open up new parts of the market for everyone.

The iPhone, for example, didn’t just help Apple, it broadened the market for mobile devices. Fracking not only breathed new life into the U.S. oil and gas industry, it benefitted suppliers to the industry.

3.  Business isn’t like war.

Originally, strategy had its application in winning battles and wars. And the only way to win is to beat the other side; the more crushing the defeat inflicted on the loser, the better.

But in business, it is possible to win without crushing the competition.

How? By finding an untapped opportunity. For example, Starbucks redefined the coffee drinking experience and Jet Blue redefined discount travel.

In order to do that, both had to understand their competitors’ value propositions – a more productive, more effective, even healthier, way to deal with competitors.

I’m not suggesting that competitors can be ignored – but they have to be kept in context.

4.  Emotion replaces logic.

Finally, when leaders go to war with their competitors, emotion often overwhelms business logic. If it can happen to Steve Jobs – remember the repercussions from iMaps – it can happen to anyone.

In case you’re curious about what set me off on this particular rant, it was a post by Ken Favaro, one of my favourite writers on strategy.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Putting The Horse Before The Cart – That’s Strategy!

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

ProfitPATH’s Top Ten Blogs – First Half 2014

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

 

1.   6 Challenges Fast Growing Companies Face

I’ve mentioned Inc. magazine www.inc.com several times before. It’s a great resource. There’s a well-researched article in the current issue about 6 challenges fast growing companies face. They’re all about execution – and if the owner doesn’t deal with them well any one of them can be fatal. more

 

 

Strategy is not planning and the importance of knowing the difference2.   The Difference Between A Strategy And A Plan

I want to talk briefly about what I think is one of the worst mistakes – confusing strategy and planning. Roger Martin wrote a post for the HBR last month in which he dealt with this very topic. I frequently hear business owners talk about the need to do “strategic planning” in order to create a “strategic plan”. Some talk – every year – about holding a “strategic planning meeting”. more

 

3time for a change in the direction you are heading, focus on center of compass....   3 Times When You May Need To Change Your Strategy

Changes to a well thought-out, well-crafted strategy shouldn’t be driven simply because it’s been in place 1, 3 or 5 years. A strategy shouldn’t necessarily be changed even if it isn’t producing results. In this situation I always look at how well (or badly) the strategy is being executed before I look at the strategy itself. So when should a company review its strategy? And what makes that review and any subsequent adaptation, revision or recreation necessary? Here are three occasions. more

4.   Adaptive Strategy – A Way To Profits In The New Normal?

Adaptive Strategy is an alternative developed by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG)1. Here’s how I think it applies to owner managed businesses. Adaptive strategy is built on the 3 R’s required in a changing environment2. Can adaptive strategy be applied in owner managed businesses? more

5.   6 Ways A Business Owner Can Influence Culture

I wrote last week about the relationship between Strategy, Culture and Leadership. As a result we’ve had some questions about how a business owner can influence the culture in his/her company. Here, in no particular priority, are 6 ways that it can be done. more

6.   6 Things We Can All Learn From Family-Owned Businesses

The 6 things I’m going to talk about come from a study of 149 large, publicly-traded, family-controlled businesses. However, stay with me because we’ve seen the same characteristics in the successful family-owned businesses we’ve dealt with – and none of them are publicly traded. Another thing – the study looked at 1997 – 2009, covering some good and some very tough times. Guess what? The family-controlled businesses, on average, turned in better long-term financial performance than non-family businesses – in multiple countries. So what are the 6 things we can learn? more

7.   6 Tips For Finding The Right Buyer

Last week I was one of three speakers at the Toronto Star’s Small Business Club event, “Exit and Succession Planning”. My talk included 6 things a business owner can do to ensure she/he finds the right buyer or successor. more

8.   3 Ways Human Nature Sabotages Strategy

Ask 10 people how long it will take them to complete a task and I’d guess 7 or 8 of them will underestimate the time required. That proportion might increase if the 10 are all type A personalities – i.e. business owners or entrepreneurs. We see this when we take teams through our strategy and business planning processes. For example, at a specific point, we prioritize the things they need to do to close the gap between their company’s current state and where they want it in 3 years’ time. Typically the teams want to tackle more items than is humanly possible given their resources. There’s no ideal number of items – the complexity of each item is only 1 of the variables – but we’ve seen time and again that completing a few key tasks produces better results than taking on too many. more

9.   5 Traits Effective Business Owners Share

I believe the single biggest thing that separates companies that grow from those that don’t is the owner’s awareness of the need for change and their willingness to do so. So, I was interested in a recent post about traits that effective entrepreneurs share. Sure enough, it contained a quote saying that if owners commit to learning more about themselves and becoming the best that they can be, they’ll find that challenges are really opportunities. But what other traits, according to the post, do effective entrepreneurs have? more

10.  Strategic Planning – 3 Things That Are Wrong With It

We all know that picking a strategy means making choices. But that means making guesses about that great unknown, the future. What happens then if we make the wrong choice? Could we destroy a company? That’s why, according to Roger Martin¹, we turn choosing a strategy into a problem that can be solved using tools we are comfortable with. And we call that strategic planning. But, Martin says, companies make 3 mistakes when they confuse strategy and strategic planning. more

 

 

Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

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