Posts Tagged ‘Strategy Development’

Recommended Reading – Summer 2015

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

After another rough winter, summer’s almost here! We’ll soon be reveling in sunshine, hot temperatures and blue skies as we enjoy water sports, barbeques, and relaxing in a lounger or hammock with a good book. Here are some of the personal favourites we’ve selected from the various “best books in 2015” lists recently published on 800ceo read’s blog:

1.  The Rise and Fall of Strategic Planning
     Henry Mintzberg, Free Press

If you follow our blog you’ll know that Henry Mintzberg is one of my favourite strategic thinkers. In this definitive history, he argues that the term is an oxymoron – that strategy cannot be planned because planning is about analysis and strategy is about synthesis. That is why, he asserts, the process has failed so often and so dramatically. He unmasks the press that has mesmerized so many organizations since 1965: strategic planning.

Mintzberg proposes new and unusual definitions of planning and strategy, and examines in novel and insightful ways the various models of strategic planning and the evidence of why they failed. Reviewing the so-called “pitfalls” of planning, he shows how the process itself can destroy commitment, narrow a company’s vision, discourage change, and breed an atmosphere of politics.

Henry Mintzberg is one of the most brilliant and original management thinkers and a great Canadian.

2.  Family Business: Practical Leadership Succession Planning: Exceed Your Expectations
     Ronald P. Smyser, Abbott Press

Less than 15% of family businesses survive to and through the second generation of leadership.

Smyser’s book provides valuable insights which demystify and simplify the process of succession; help ensure continuing financial security for the founder and his/her family; and enhance the effectiveness and balance of professional and private life.

Some of the topics he covers are:

  • How ownership transition without a clear, practical leadership succession plan can decimate your business’s chance of survival.
  • The fifteen key causes of leadership succession failure and how to avoid them.
  • What the next generation really wants but won’t tell you and what you should do.
  • The issues around choosing one of your children to succeed you, and how to avoid them.

Whether you already have a family business or are starting one, “Family Business: Practical Leadership Succession Planning” is a must read.

3.  Fewer, Bigger, Bolder: From Mindless Expansion to Focused Growth
     Sanjay Khosla and Mohanbir Sawhney, Portfolio

When it comes to growing revenues, not all dollars are equal. In company after company that the authors worked for or researched, they saw businesses taking on more products, markets, people, acquisitions – more of everything except what really mattered: sustainable and profitable growth.

In many of these companies – large or small, from America to Europe to Asia – every quarter became a mad dash to find yet another short-term revenue boost. There had to be a better way. The answer lies in “Fewer, Bigger, Bolder”, a market-proven, step-by-step program to achieve sustained growth with rising profits and lower costs.

“Fewer, Bigger, Bolder” crosses the usual boundaries of strategy, execution, people and organization. Its framework shows how you can drive growth by targeting resources against priorities, simplifying your operations, and unleashing the potential of your people.

“Fewer, Bigger, Bolder” challenges the conventional wisdom about growth.

4.  Business Strategy: A Guide to Effective Decision-Making
     Jeremy Kourdi, The Economist

A good strategy, well implemented, determines a business’ future success or failure.

Yet history is full of strategic decisions that were ill-conceived, poorly organized and consequently disastrous. This updated guide looks at the whole process of strategic decision-making, from vision, forecasting, and resource allocation, through to implementation and innovation.

Strategy is about understanding where you are now, where you are heading and how you will get there.

But getting it right involves difficult choices: which customers to target, what products to offer, and the best way to keep costs low and service high. And constantly changing business conditions inevitably bring risks. Even after business strategy has been developed, a company must remain nimble and alert to change, and view strategy as an ongoing and evolving process.

The message of this guide is simple: strategy matters, and getting it right is fundamental to business success.

5.  Business Strategy: Managing Uncertainty, Opportunity, and Enterprise
     J.-C. Spender, Oxford University Press

Emphasizing that firms face uncertainties and unknowns, Spender argues that the core of strategic thinking and processes rests on leaders developing newly imagined solutions to the opportunities that these uncertainties open up.

Drawing on a wide range of ideas, he stresses the importance of judgment in strategy, and argues that a key element of the entrepreneur and executive’s task is to engage chosen uncertainties, develop a language to express and explain the firm’s particular business model for dealing with these, and thus create innovation and value.

At the same time he shows how the language the strategist creates to do this gives the firm identity and purpose, and communicates this to its members, stakeholders, and customers.

Spender introduces these ideas, and reviews the strategy tools currently available from consultants and academics.

The book outlines a structured practice that managers and consultants might chose to follow, not a theory.

6.  Reinventors: How Extraordinary Companies Pursue Radical Continuous Change
     Jason Jennings, Portfolio

For most businesses, success is fleeting. There are only two real choices: stick with the status quo until things inevitably decline, or continuously change to stay vital. But how?

Bestselling leadership and management guru Jason Jennings and his researchers screened 22,000 companies around the world that had been cited as great examples of reinvention.

They selected the best, verified their success, interviewed their leaders, and learned how they pursue never-ending radical change. The fresh insights they discovered became Jennings’s “reinvention rules” for any business. The featured companies include Starbucks—which turned itself around by making tons of small bets on new ideas.

7.  The Moment You Can’t Ignore: When Big Trouble Leads to a Great Future: How Culture Drives Strategic Change
     Malachi O’Connor and Barry Dornfeld, Public Affairs

Culture not only affects how we think and behave, it’s the set of agreements and behaviors that drive how we act in groups and the decisions we collectively make.

Every organization now faces challenges it can’t ignore as new forms of work, communication and technology wreak havoc on the way we do things.

Malachi O’Connor and Barry Dornfeld provide powerful insights on how to confront the clash of old and new. They show how to ask the big questions that point the way to renewing a culture.

When people don’t know who’s in charge, are unsure of what their company identity is, and can’t get behind their leaders, they rarely have the ability or will to innovate.

Old ideas get rehashed. New ideas get squashed or lost. Initiatives that are designed to create an innovation culture or spur creativity go nowhere.

8.  Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done
    Larry Bossidy, Ram Charan, Crown Business

Finally – an old favourite – a book that shows how to get the job done and deliver results.

The leader’s most important job is selecting and appraising people. Why? With the right people in the right jobs, there’s a leadership gene pool that conceives and selects a strategy that can be executed, a strategy in sync with the realities of the marketplace, the economy, and the competition.

Once the right people and strategy are in place, they are then linked to an operating process that results in the implementation of specific programs and actions and that assigns accountability.

This kind of effective operating process goes way beyond the typical budget exercise that looks into a rearview mirror to set its goals. It puts reality behind the numbers and is where the rubber meets the road.

Putting an execution culture in place is hard, but losing it is easy.

For a full listing of best books in 2015, please visit http://800ceoread.com/

 

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

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Get Results From Your Strategy Offsites

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

Holding a strategy offsite is like going to the dentist.Get results from strategy offsites with these tips

Doing it regularly should prevent unexpected pain and discomfort.

But going to the dentist is something that can be avoided. Why do it when everything’s going well, when it’s not necessary?

After all, a visit to the dentist can result in discomfort or even end badly.

It’s the same thing with a planning meeting.

It’s uncomfortable when, for example, people don’t want to get behind the business owner’s ‘stretch’ goals. And most people can look back on an offsite they attended and wonder why they bothered – because nothing changed.

So here are some things we’ve learned to ensure strategy offsites deliver results.

1.    Before the meeting

Set a realistic goal.

I ask clients to imagine we’re packing up after the last day of the offsite, and they’re feeling really good about what has been achieved.

Then I ask them what has to have happened for them to be feeling that way.

Sometimes, after they reply, we have to use our experience to illustrate what can, and can’t, be achieved in 1 or 2 days.

Distribute pre-work before the strategy offsite to maximize productivity in the time spent face-to-face. Any thinking that can be done in advance should be and any information required to make decisions should be distributed and studied.

2.    During the offsite

Keep people focused by:

• Announcing times for coffee and lunch breaks and insisting email and calls are dealt with then.

• Using a  ‘parking lot’ to record topics that are important, but not immediately relevant. Clear it at the end of each day.

Relieve the intensity of the discussions by using brainteasers and humorous video clips. Vary the pace, and make sure everyone’s thoughts are heard, by using sub-groups for some sessions.

Our process ends with the development of specific, measurable, time-related action plans to solve the problem that was the focus of the offsite.  Appoint Champions to coordinate the completion of the Plans.

This way everyone leaves with a sense of accomplishment and a clear plan of action.

3.    After the meeting

Capitalize on the momentum by holding regular, structured follow-up meetings.

Get everyone together at least once a quarter. Each Champion gives a progress report on his or her Action Plan and adjustments are made if necessary.

Take these tips and you’ll get results from your strategy offsites.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy What’s The Best Strategy – Grow The Core Or Expand?

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Your Company, Your House

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015

I heard a wonderful metaphor a couple of weeks ago.To grow your business, think of your company as a house

Think of your company as a house.

The functional areas or departments – for example sales, marketing, operations, HR and finance – each represent a room in the house.

You can’t have a house without rooms and rooms have no purpose on their own. A house is not a home if it’s just a bunch of rooms.

The construction materials with which your house is built are, for example, peoples’ skills and experience; processes that enable the areas to function effectively; IT systems that provide data to manage performance.

Your culture is the mortar holding your house together.

What happens when we decide we want to grow? After all, as business owners, our main – if not sole – focus is on growth.

Growth can be achieved in 2 ways. By making one or more rooms in your existing house larger or by designing and building a bigger house.

1.  Making one or more rooms bigger

You can do this by, for example, adding more sales people to bring in more orders, or by launching a marketing campaign to generate more leads.

But making one room in a house bigger puts pressure on the other rooms. That has consequences. If you don’t believe me, try making one of your children’s bedrooms larger while making another one’s smaller.

As one room or area grows, everything else is forced out of proportion. You may even put pressure on the structure of the house and cracks will appear as the bricks and mortar strain to hold everything together.

A couple of examples of the business equivalent are tight cash flow, an increasing backlog of orders or losing good people.

2.  Designing and building a bigger house

Design and build a larger house and you grow, while structurally keeping everything in proportion.

How does this apply to your Company?

Designing and building a bigger house is equivalent to developing and executing a business strategy.

Each of the functions, or rooms, still has its own strategy. But they work in the context of, and by supporting, the strategy for the entire house/business.

If you involve your team in the design, the end product will be better and they’ll be more committed to getting it built.

I like this metaphor. What do you think?

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Sustainable Growth – How To Achieve It

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Business Growth – Hard Truths and The Way Ahead

Tuesday, February 24th, 2015

Every company runs out of momentum sooner or later.Hard truths and the way ahead - the importance of strategic planning

When it happens, it’s really frustrating and confusing for business owners who have overseen many years of steady growth. Discovering that the things that re-started growth in the past no longer work is hard to understand.

So is accepting that it’s not necessarily because of something they have not done.

When they come to terms with all of that, a bigger, harder step is waiting – realizing that they:

  • Have to do something they may never have done before – strategic planning – and they
  • May need help doing it.

Notice I say strategic planning, which is a process, not writing a strategic plan, which is a document that will lie unused from the day it’s completed.

Done well, strategic planning will help a business owner see the smartest way forward, while providing flexibility to adapt as more information becomes available.

Two things make strategic planning more important today than before.

  • The volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity (VUCA) that exists today, and
  • Accelerating technological changes, which have opened up opportunities to businesses of all sizes, in all industry sectors.

An article in Inc. magazine last year confirms the points I’ve made and reinforces 2 of the 4 things that I’ve said growing companies have to do to turn strategic planning into results.

Develop a Clear Growth Path

A good, old-fashioned SWOT analysis provides the foundation for a growth path.

It’s not something that gets people leaping around with excitement. But, done well, it helps a company get results by using its strengths to figure out the best opportunities to take.

That drives out what has to be done to close the gap between where the business is now and where the owner wants it to be in 3 years’ time.

Link it to Action

A number of things will have to be done to close the gap. They have to be prioritized so that those providing the greatest leverage for long-term success are completed first.

The top priorities are broken into very specific, measurable action/project plans and someone is made accountable for completing each one.

The action/project plans drive the goals for each of the 3 fiscal years. They are reviewed throughout each year and before the start of subsequent years – keeping flexibility in the strategic planning process.

Next time

I’ll give you some tips on how to run strategic planning off-sites.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Playing It Safe – The Enemy Of Business Growth

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

What is a Strategy Focused Organization?

Tuesday, February 17th, 2015

 

This week’s guest is Dick Albu, the founder and president of Albu Consulting, a strategy management consulting firm focused on engaging and energizing leadership teams of middle market private and family business to formulate robust business strategies and follow through on execution of key strategic initiatives.

 

 

The ultimate prize for all NFL football teams is a Super Bowl win.  There is no greater reward for a well planned and executed season.  Management, coaches, and players need to be aligned and focused for every game.  They also need to be committed to the overall team strategy.  Successful teams embrace the strategy focused organization model.

What can business owners and CEO’s learn from these NFL football teams?  A strategy focused organization understands that strategy is dynamic and it has adapted a continuous strategy management process of addressing issues and weaknesses, leveraging strengths, and exploiting opportunities on a timely basis. As with a winning football team, the ability to successfully execute the game plan is critical to business owners and their management teams. Here are three key elements for successful strategy execution.

Mobilize and engage the senior team – Alignment and commitment from the senior team is an essential ingredient to success.  Without complete buy-in from the leadership team, it is a sure bet that little change will happen.  Management and coaches all need to be on the same page, guided by a strategy that everyone has bought into.  Involving and getting buy-in from all managers through a collaborative process is critical to creating a strategy focused organization.  Keep in mind that this type of engagement does not happen overnight.  Establishing a strategy focused organization happens over years, not weeks or months.

Translate strategy to action in a way everyone can understand – Use a simple system that everyone can understand to explain who needs to do what by when.   Successful coaches make game plans easy to understand and make execution as flawless possible.   In our experience, a simple framework where objectives, initiatives and tactics are aligned creates a great deal of clarity and ensures engagement.   Employees get energized when they understand how they can contribute to the success of the strategy.

Embed the strategy execution process into day-to-day business operations – Organizations need a predictive, consistent, and continuous methodology to manage strategy execution.  Coaches are constantly making adjustments to their strategy as the season progresses because they appreciate that the football season is dynamic.  New opportunities or critical issues come up at any time, like an injury that leaves you without your starting quarterback.   Organizations need to think in the same way.  Strategy requires a dynamic and continuous process with consistent follow up throughout the year with the entire organization. Our approach with clients requires an ongoing execution process of monthly, quarterly, and annual meetings to measure, review progress and adapt strategy as necessary .

There are obviously many more aspects to creating a strategy focused organization that can lead change and improve performance.  Skipping any of these elements will prevent any company from achieving success.  We would like to hear your reaction to these important points, and let us know how you are creating a strategy focused organization.

Dick can be reached at 203-321-2147 or RAlbu@albuconsulting.com. For more information on Albu Consulting visit www.albuconsulting.com.

Santa Claus and VUCA

Monday, December 15th, 2014

The Holiday season set me thinking.VUCA and its impact on strategy

One of the traditions in our version of the Holidays is the letter/email from each child to Santa Claus, the determination if the child has been naughty or nice and, assuming the latter, the resulting delivery of gifts on Christmas morning.

To execute successfully, Santa manufactures or purchases the gifts then packages and delivers them.

These operations take place in his workshop and distribution centre, located at the North Pole and staffed by elves.

This much we know for fact.

This year, however, there’s a question around Santa’s strategy which is of fundamental interest to all strategy consultants.

What is the impact, if any, of VUCA (volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity)?

Academics and key figures in the consulting world appear to agree that VUCA exists. But that’s about it.

Because, while some say it has made strategy and strategic planning redundant, others argue it has no impact whatsoever on the need for an organization to develop and execute a coherent strategy.

It’s important at this point to determine Santa’s KPI’s.

The 2 critical performance factors are accuracy (the right kid gets the right toy) and on time delivery (the toys are delivered during the night on Christmas Eve). Quality is irrelevant because kids spend more time playing with the wrapping than with the presents.

It’s assumed that Santa has availed himself (I’m assigning a male orientation to the incumbent. A discussion of the suitability of other genders for the role is a topic for a future post) of all modern processes and technologies.

Lean manufacturing; warehouse management systems; mobile computing; performance-based compensation for elves; and video monitoring of child behavior, with NSA input on social media patterns; the use of ‘big data’ etc., etc., are all givens.

And Santa’s strategy is tried and tested over many years.

So the only variable is VUCA.

The only way we can be sure of the outcome is to wait until Christmas morning and conduct rapid research by monitoring social media trends and conducting structured telephone interviews with a representative sample of the population.

Now, I am not given to making predictions.

But, given the season, I am going to break this habit. I predict that Santa’s performance this year will be at least on a par with previous years.

Which means that VUCA will have had as little impact on his need for a strategy as it has on the needs of every other organization.

Happy Holidays!

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy 3 Techniques For Removing Bias From The Big Decisions

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Be Known For The Things You Do – And For Those You Don’t

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

In last week’s post I spoke about one of the reasons I started ProfitPATH 12 years ago.let your business be known for the things you do - and for those you don't

I wanted to create a company that did things differently to the way in which management consultants traditionally behaved.

To act as a guide, I made a list of all the things consultants I’d hired over the years had done that had annoyed me – and said we’ll do the opposite.

While I’ve often spoken about the list, I’ve never actually publicized it.

Now I’ve decided to change that. As a start, I thought we’d replace some of the outdated content on our current web site with the list.

I had to dig through some really old files but I found the original piece of paper on which I’d written the list.

Here it is.

We exist to help business owners achieve the results they want for their companies.  To do that we will:

1.   Tell clients when:

•  We don’t know how to do what they need. We will focus on what we do best.
•  They can do something by themselves. We will not bill clients for unnecessary work.
•  We don’t understand their requirements – even if it makes us look silly. We will not risk missing their expectations.
•  They ask us to provide “silver bullet” solutions. The Lone Ranger may have those – but we don’t.
•  We can’t provide what they need at the price or to meet the schedule they want. We will not “agree now, modify later”.

2.  Adapt and use tools and processes that we know deliver results. We will not use clients as guinea pigs.

3.  Design our services so that we can see the results of our work. We will not write reports and walk away.

4.  Find ways to link our compensation to the results of our work. This will be hard but we will not give up.

5.  Allow clients to terminate a project at any time – without a financial penalty.

6.  Always offer references. Where possible from clients of a similar size, in a similar industry.

7.  Submit proposals which contain absolutely no surprises – because they include only things we’ve already discussed with the client.

After seeing the list again I’m proud of how we’ve run the business.

However, I’m wondering what, if anything I missed.

What do you think?

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy The Elusive ‘Silver Bullet’

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Recommended Reading – Winter 2014

Tuesday, November 11th, 2014

Hello, winter!  Snowflakes are dancing on the air and covering the land in a wardrobe of white.  A touch of arctic air is pinching our noses and cheeks.  Time to get comfortable and pick up a good book. Here are some of the personal favourites we’ve selected from the various “best books in 2014” lists published recently on 800ceo read’s blog:

Drawing upon a six-year research project at the Stanford University Graduate School of Business, James C. Collins and Jerry I. Porras took eighteen truly exceptional and long-lasting companies and studied each in direct comparison to one of its top competitors. They examined the companies from their very beginnings to the present day — as start-ups, as mid-size companies, and as large corporations. Throughout, the authors asked: “What makes the truly exceptional companies different from the comparison companies and what were the common practices these enduringly great companies followed throughout their history?” Filled with hundreds of specific examples and organized into a coherent framework of practical concepts that can be applied by managers and entrepreneurs at all levels, Built to Last provides a master blueprint for building organizations that will prosper long into the 21st century and beyond.

Obviously, there are lots of things that matter now. But in a world of fractured certainties and battered trust, some things matter more than others. While the challenges facing organizations are limitless; leadership bandwidth isn’t. That’s why you have to be clear about what really matters now. What are the fundamental, make-or-break issues that will determine whether your organization thrives or dives in the years ahead? Hamel identifies five issues are that are paramount: values, innovation, adaptability, passion and ideology. In doing so he presents an essential agenda for leaders everywhere who are eager to…move from defense to offense, reverse the tide of commoditization, defeat bureaucracy, astonish their customers, foster extraordinary contribution, capture the moral high ground, outrun change, build a company that’s truly fit for the future. Concise and to the point, “What Matters Now” will inspire you to rethink your business, your company and how you lead.

A guide for protecting your wealth in an age of turbulent business cycles. In “Prosperity in the Age of Decline”, Brian and Alan Beaulieu offer an informed, meticulously-researched look at the future and the coming Great Depression.

Surprisingly, most companies fail not because demand is low or conditions are difficult, but simply because they don’t know how to manage, nurture, or even maintain their own growth and success. At each developmental stage, they become vulnerable to chaos, no matter how strong or expert their leaders. Most leaders feel a sense of isolation, assuming they have to know it all and end up making critical mistakes. Dando calls these critical mistakes the 12 Warning Signs of Success, and he helps leaders across industries identify, anticipate, and avoid them on the way from startup to Fortune 500. Maybe you’ve hired the wrong person, have too many direct reports, or say yes to everything; you might believe your own hype, incentivize failure, or lose track of your core values. Dando, known in leadership circles as the Company Whisperer, encountered all the same challenges as a C-level executive in a high-growth billion-dollar business, and he knows that these moments of truth determine whether the leader and the company become a strong, mature, and sustainable organization, or drift toward an uncertain future.

If you’re aiming to innovate, failure along the way is a given. But can you fail “better”? Whether you’re rolling out a new product from a city-view office or rolling up your sleeves to deliver a social service in the field, learning why and how to embrace failure can help you do better, faster. Smart leaders, entrepreneurs, and change agents design their innovation projects with a key idea in mind: “ensure that every failure is maximally useful. In “Fail Better”, Anjali Sastry and Kara Penn show how to create the conditions, culture, and habits to systematically, ruthlessly, and quickly figure out what works, in three steps:
1. Launch every innovation project with the right groundwork
2. Build and refine ideas and products through iterative action
3. Identify and embed the learning
You may be a “Fortune” 500 manager, scrappy start-up innovator, social impact visionary, or simply leading your own small project. If you aim to break through without breaking the bank–or ruining your reputation—“Fail Better” is for you.

An insider’s look at how a successful leadership pipeline can make or break a company Starting out at GE, where he headed up the company’s leadership institute and revamped the leadership pipeline under Jack Welch, Noel Tichy has served as a trusted advisor on management succession to such leading companies as Royal Dutch Shell, Nokia, Intel, Ford, Mercedes-Benz, Merck and Caterpillar. Now Tichy draws on decades of hands-on experience working with CEOs and boards to provide a framework for building a smart, effective transition pipeline, whether for a multi-billion dollar conglomerate, a family business, a small start-up, or a non-profit. Through revealing case studies like Hewlett Packard, IBM, Yahoo, P&G, Intel, and J.C. Penney, he examines why some companies fail and others succeed in training and sustaining the next generation of senior leaders. He highlights the common mistakes that can generate embarrassing headlines and may even call an organization’s survival into question, and reveals the best practices of those who got it right. Tichy also positions leadership talent development and succession where they belong: at the top of every leader’s agenda.

The market for business knowledge is booming as companies looking to improve their performance pour millions of dollars into training programmes, consultants, and executive education. Why then, are there so many gaps between what firms know they should do and what they actual do? This volume confronts the challenge of turning knowledge about how to improve performance into actions that produce measurable results. The authors identify the causes of this gap and explain how to close it.

According to a study published in “Chief Executive Magazine,” the most valued skill in leaders today is strategic thinking. However, more than half of all companies say that strategic thinking is the skill their senior leaders most need to improve. “Elevate” provides leaders with a framework and toolkit for developing “advanced” strategic thinking capabilities. Unlike the majority of books that focus on strategy from a corporate perspective, “Elevate” gives the individual executive practical tools and techniques to help them become a truly strategic leader. The new framework that will enable leaders to finally integrate both strategy and innovation into a strategic
approach that drives their profitable growth is the Three Disciplines of “Advanced” Strategic Thinking:
1. Coalesce: Fusing together insights to create an innovative business model.
2. Compete: Creating a system of strategy to achieve competitive advantage.
3. Champion: Leading others to think and act strategically to execute strategy.
Every leader desperately wants to be strategic – their career depends on it. “Elevate” provides the roadmap to reach the strategic leadership summit.

“Escape Velocity” offers a pragmatic plan to engage the most critical challenge that established enterprises face in the twenty-first-century economy: how to move beyond past success and drive next-generation growth from new lines of business.
As he worked with senior management teams, Moore repeatedly found that executives were trapped by short-term performance-based compensation schemes. The result was critical decision-makers overweighting their legacy commitments, an embarrassingly low success rate in new-product launches, and a widespread failure to sustain any kind of next-generation business at scale.
In “Escape Velocity”, Moore presents a cogent strategy for generating future growth within an established enterprise. Organized around a hierarchy of powers: category power, company power, market power, offer power, and execution power, this insightful work shows how each level of power can be orchestrated to achieve overall success.

In this work, noted consultant Erika Andersen helps the reader approach business and life strategically, explaining why it is important, what’s involved in doing it, and how to do it. 

For a full listing of best books in 2014, please visit http://800ceoread.com/

 

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Strategy, Motherhood, The Dog and Its Tail

Tuesday, November 4th, 2014

Do you remember that old expression “The tail’s wagging the dog”?The tail's wagging the dog or, the process is more important than the result

It was used to describe situations in which, for example, a process for doing something takes on more importance than the result it produces.

Why did I think of that now?

Simply, for many companies, this is the time of year in which they begin their strategic or business planning.

This process is often viewed as unproductive, frustrating, even pointless or a waste of time. So it may not be welcomed with enthusiasm.

Why is that?

After 13 years of working with business owners and their teams, I have a few ideas:

1.  Strategy development is a difficult, creative, iterative activity. But in many organizations the ‘planning’ process has to be completed in a predetermined period of time, in the same month or quarter, every year. That’s the tail wagging the dog.

2.  We use terms like strategic planning, business planning, and even budgeting, interchangeably as if they all refer to the same thing. They don’t.

  • Strategy development involves making well thought out choices about the future.
  • Business planning is about the activities that have to be completed in the next 12 months to execute the strategy.
  • Budgeting is estimating the financial outcomes of the activities in the annual business plan.

3.  If we’re not clear about what we’re setting out to do, everyone will expect a different outcome and no one will end up getting the result they wanted.

4.  Worse, the results we do get may not be useful. By trying to do more than one thing at a time, we end up doing none of them well. The result is a breathtaking series of ‘motherhood’ statements that are neither a strategy nor focused action plans.

5.  We begin the process with a budget, the financial targets the owner wants to achieve, and make the ‘strategy’ fit those. That, to use another metaphor, is putting the cart before the horse.

6.  Even if the results are useful, we don’t follow up. We are so busy dealing with day-to-day challenges there is simply no time. In reality, we lack discipline – not time.

Is it surprising that many business owners, executives, managers and employees are cynical about ‘planning’?

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Strategy and Planning – How Business Owners Think

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Good Strategy Execution Pays Off

Tuesday, October 28th, 2014

I’ve believed for many years that how a company executes its strategy is more important than how it develops the strategy.Good strategy execution pays off well when you focus on these 7 key capabilities

I’m talking about the business strategy, the one that deals with all parts, departments or functions of a company.

My point could also apply to departmental or specific strategies; for example, sales or marketing strategies, since theoretically, these all flow from the business strategy and are integrated with it.

Previously, I’ve never had any evidence to support my belief since common sense, apparently, does not qualify as evidence.

No more.

Earlier this year, no less an authority than McKinsey & Company¹ gave me evidentiary support for my arguments.

They used their Implementation Capability Assessment to separate companies that are good at execution from those that aren’t. The survey then found that good implementers:

  • Maintain twice the value from their prioritized opportunities after 2 years.
  • Score their companies 30% higher on a series of financial performance indicators.

So there! Executing well pays off – literally.

How do you know if your company is a good implementer or a poor implementer?

McKinsey identified 7 key capabilities for executing well. Every company may have them to some extent. Yet businesses which are good at execution, are almost twice as good at them.

The 7 capabilities are:

  1. Ownership and commitment to execution at all levels of the company.
  2. Focus on a set of priorities.
  3. Clear accountability for specific actions.
  4. Effective management of execution using common tools.
  5. Planning for long-term commitment to execution.
  6. Continuous improvement during execution and rapid reaction to amend plans as required.
  7. Allocation of adequate resources and capabilities.

Finally, here’s the good news. Good implementers believe that execution is an individual discipline, which can be improved over time.

Does this confirm my belief that how a company executes its strategy is more important than how it develops the strategy?

Partially. More importantly, it does demonstrate that time spent improving a company’s ability to execute is time well invested.

As for the comparison to developing a strategy – I’ll just have to keep on looking.

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¹ “Why Implementation Matters”, McKinsey & Company Insights, August 2014

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy To Grow or Not To Grow – That Is The Question

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

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