Posts Tagged ‘succession planning’

From Strategy to Results – Plus Some Succession Planning

Tuesday, January 6th, 2015

In an ’80s TV series called “The A Team”, one of the main characters used to say “I love it when a plan comes together”.Good strategy executed successfully

Here’s a wonderful example of a real life plan coming together.

In 2009 a recruiting company called LEAPJob hired us to help them with their business strategy.

It was a family business founded by Donna and Marcus Miller. One of their sons, Jeremy, worked in the firm with them. Stephen, their other son, had a very successful career with a large software company.

There were 3 major issues to consider.

First, the Millers believed the recruiting industry was undergoing fundamental change. They were concerned about the future for smaller companies.

Second, LEAPJob had an extremely high level of brand recognition in its target market and a very successful on-line lead generation engine.

Finally, Donna and Marcus were thinking about retiring.

The outcome was a 2-step strategy.

The recruiting business would be sold in approximately 3 years and Donna and Marcus would retire.

While they were positioning LEAPJob for sale, Donna and Marcus would help Jeremy launch a new business. This would leverage his skills in marketing and branding – competencies Jeremy had honed by leading the rebranding effort and building the lead generation engine.

Fast forward to January 2015.

Jeremy’s first book, published by an established Canadian label, is about to be launched. It will be available in stores and on-line via Amazon, Barnes and Noble and iBooks, amongst others, in a few days’ time.

The title of the book “Sticky Branding” is also the name of his company.

Jeremy’s commented a number of times over the years that our process played a significant role in his journey.

But the idea to pinpoint and profile small and mid-sized companies with sticky brands; the analytical skills to see the factors common to them; and the creativity to combine those factors and his own experience were all Jeremy’s.

The result – lessons which can be applied by the owners of small and mid-sized companies who want their companies to “stand out, attract customers & grow an incredible brand”

He’s had to deal with some hard knocks and tough times but now Jeremy is on the brink of success. I admire his focus and willpower.

Donna and Marcus are happily retired.

I love it when a good strategy is executed successfully.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Strategies That Get Results Are Developed By Thinkers And Doers

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

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6 Tips For Finding The Right Buyer

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

Last week I was one of three speakers at the Toronto Star’s Small Business Club event, “Exit and Succession Planning”.Finding the right buyer or successor for your business

My talk included 6 things a business owner can do to ensure she/he finds the right buyer or successor.

1.  Money. The seller must be satisfied that the buyer has the funds to complete the transaction.

In a sale to a third party, for example, the seller must obtain evidence – from a bank or accountant – that the buyer can meet their commitments.

But having money isn’t enough – particularly if part of the purchase price is to be paid from future profits.

2.  Knowledge of the Industry. The better a buyer’s knowledge of the industry, the more likely the transition will succeed.

In a Management Buy Out (MBO) or family succession, the current owner knows the key players’ level of knowledge.

If the owner has been planning ahead, they will, for example, have given the players opportunities to build relationships in industry associations.

3.  Business Acumen. The purchaser or successor must have proven they know how to make money.

For example, a third-party buyer may have been a successful CEO or owned other businesses. A family member may have done well for a company in another industry or country.

4.  Appetite for Risk. When you’re watching someone else run a company it’s easy to underestimate the risks they are taking.

For example, as an MBO progresses, the management team begin to understand fully the risks that come with ownership.

That’s one reason why MBO’s collapse more frequently than sales to third parties or transfers to family members.

5.  People Skills. A seller must look for evidence that a third-party purchaser has successfully led people and built strong relationships with customers and suppliers.

By planning for an MBO or transfer to a family member, the owner can give the key players opportunities to prove their capability.

6.  Business/Strategic Plan. Regardless whose it is, a business plan has to pass 4 tests.

  • Don’t attempt too much too quickly.
  • Have clear Action Plans to ensure implementation.
  • Provide adequate resources to support the Action Plans.
  • Have a clear follow up and review process.

Hopefully they’re all common sense. If so, the transition will go well – and the party can begin!

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Don’t Destroy the Long Term Value of Your Company……

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Keeping the Business in the Family – A Cautionary Tale

Tuesday, August 13th, 2013

The stories written by the children who bought family businesses should be mandatory reading for all business owners.http://www.profitpath.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/iStock_000016746886XSmall.jpg

Let’s face it, the successors have a unique perspective. They’ve seen what does happen, not what might happen.

For example, a young Australian woman – let’s call her Alex – was told by her father that he had only 12 to 18 months to live. Would she buy the family business?

She, of course, said yes. Most of us would have done.

The company printed “What’s On in Sydney” and distributed it through every hotel in the city. Over the years there had been offers for the business, but they hadn’t met her father’s valuation so he hadn’t taken them.

Alex was a successful freelance writer. She’d never run a business and, until her father announced his illness, had never shown interest in the family one.

She co-opted a brother to redesigning the magazine, they built a web site and her father introduced her to all of her advertisers. And she got to spend 2 or 3 days a week with her father as he taught her the business.

But, after a few months, Alex realized that, while she loved writing, she hated selling advertising so much that she couldn’t keep on doing it.

And she had to tell her father.

So, one day a few weeks before he died, Alex called him. She felt devastated, that she had really let him down.

Soon afterwards he was admitted to palliative care.

With her father’s business partner, Alex found a business broker and put the business up for sale just before her father died.

What’s to be learned?

1.  Her father had passed up opportunities to sell the business because he was stubborn about the valuation that he wanted. He should have compromised. In these circumstances the company probably sold for less than it would have done had the sale been well planned.

2.  Alex responded with emotion rather than logic when asked to buy the business.

3.  Would things have been different if her dad had brought Alex and her brother into the business earlier? They could have complemented each other – Alex writing, her brother doing the design work and her father selling ads.

4.  With more time to prepare, they could possibly have hired someone to replace her dad.

Alex describes the experience as being “rough at the time”. That’s probably an understatement.

Losing a parent is hard. Watching one wilt under cancer has to be worse.

Moving into and learning a business is difficult in the best of times. Deciding to sell is probably one of the hardest things that anyone does in their life.

Dealing with two major life events at once cannot be easy.

And it’s all so avoidable. It’s called succession planning.

If you want to read the story in Alex’s words go here.

 

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy 4 Reasons Why Every Business Should Be Sold…..Eventually

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Succession Planning and Human Nature

Tuesday, July 9th, 2013

Many of the business owners we meet consider their own sudden or unexpected death to be so unlikely as to be impossible. So, they see absolutely no need to plan for it.Succession planning is so important for business owners

A few even ridicule the idea.

Life has, however, repeatedly demonstrated it won’t be influenced by what business owners think.

As a result, an event, which was deemed to be impossible, becomes all too real. Recently it happened to the founder of a company we’d worked with.

It’s tragic when these situations occur.

The business owner’s family, like any other family, has to cope with their grief – that’s unavoidable.

But they also have to deal with a company which has not been prepared for this situation – and which may be struggling financially. And this, it can be argued, is avoidable.

The need for succession planning has been widely discussed for a number of years. There are books available; accountants and lawyers have been holding workshops for a long time; and, of course, there are consultants offering succession-planning services.

So, there was a solution – it just wasn’t taken. It’s tempting to sit on the sidelines and, hindsight being the only exact science, say that.

But to do so is to deny human nature.

Most of us find dealing with our own mortality somewhere on a sliding scale that begins at difficult and ends at impossible.

Business owners are no better than the rest of us at dealing with mortality, if anything they’re worse.  They’re used to being in control of what’s happening around them. And becoming ill or dying is way outside of anyone’s control.

Some entrepreneurs find a way to rationalize succession planning so that they can at least tackle it. Or they force themselves to look at it as just another job that has to be dealt with.

But some can’t do that and so they avoid it.

The strange thing is that those who can’t deal with it love their families just as much as those who can. They often started their business as a way to provide a good way of life for their partners and children.

Yet they expose them to a very difficult situation at a time when they’re already dealing with one of the worst events in their lives.

I don’t know what is happening to the family of the founder we worked with. She loved her work and had difficulty letting go of any aspect of the company. And so she also had a hard time believing a succession plan was necessary, despite the fact she’d already had a bout of bad health.

I can only hope she had changed her way of thinking and implemented a succession plan.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy 4 Things Every Business Owner Must Think About

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Top Ten In 2012……

Tuesday, January 15th, 2013

The votes (page views) have been counted, the results can be announced!

Our top 10 blog posts in 2012 were:

1.    Do You Know What You Don’t Know? was the winner by far. It talks about how consultants and business owners are doing the same thing wrong, with the same outcome.

2.    Why Would Anyone Hire A Management Consultant? is a question put to business owners whose businesses have stopped growing.

3.    6 Ways a Business Owner Can Influence Culture outlines how a business owner can influence the culture in his/her company.

4.    10 Tips To Improve Your Public Speaking Body Language, written by Mark Bowden of TruthPlane, is the first of our guest posts to make the list.

5.    Things Really Good Consultants Say outlines what consultants who get results and deliver a great service say while pitching for business.

6.    Strategy, Culture and Leadership deals with how these 3 things affect the development and the execution of strategy.

7.    3 Times When You May Need To Change Your Strategy explains when a company should review its strategy and what makes that review and any subsequent actions necessary.

8.    6 Challenges Fast Growing Companies Face discusses the 6 challenges of execution which, if not dealt with, could prove fatal.

9.    Why You Need A Consultant With Hands-On Experience is one of several posts we wrote during the year about how to work with consultants.

10.    So Tell Me, What Is Strategy? In some cases strategy and strategic are being imbued with mystique and complexity in order to create a need for “expertise”.  Here are 2 reasons why should we care.

If you haven’t seen them before, here’s your opportunity!

Things Really Good Consultants Say

Thursday, April 5th, 2012

I am so excited!

There’s an absolutely fabulous article on the Inc. magazine web site. Okay, everything they publish is good. But this article is way up there.

The point the author makes is that consultants who get results and deliver a great service say certain things while they are pitching for business. Business owners who listen for them can dramatically reduce their risk when selecting or hiring a consultant.

Why am I excited? Because we say these things all the time – we really do!

Here are my favourites.

1.    “I don’t know.” Why would you say anything else? The client is going to figure out that  you don’t know what you’re talking about sooner or later.

And we’re not in business to learn at a client’s expense.

Consultants should only offer services in areas with which they’re intimately familiar (no I won’t use the “expert” word, I dislike it intensely). That’s because they’ve spent a long time acquiring skill and experience in the topic. And they’re still learning and staying up to date in the field.

Our field was originally strategy development and execution. To that we’ve recently added succession planning

2.    “You can do that on your own.” I’m going to meet a client later today and tell him just that. Why? Because he has the expertise to complete some of the project steps in house.

I appreciate it when the people and companies I deal with try to save me money. Why wouldn’t our clients feel the same? And the time that we save by taking this approach we spend looking for things that truly only we can do.

It’s also our policy to bill out at the rate of the person who does the work. So if we use support staff to complete a task, we bill it at their rate, not mine.

Yes I’m a Scotsman but I like to live up to my name as the “canny Scotsman”.

3.    “I still don’t understand the requirements.” I’ll risk appearing slow to understand at the front end of a project to avoid risking missed expectations at the back end.

Despite the number of years I’ve been in business it never ceases to amaze me how quickly and easily misunderstandings occur. One bad assumption about what was meant can lead to great frustration – and damage to our reputation.

So, if there’s any room for misinterpretation it’s better to ask a clarifying question.

4.    “We’ll want to come back later to see how things turned out.” The challenge for our profession is that the consulting assignment could be finishing just as the real work is starting.

Call me nosey but, while some consultants will walk away at the end of the project, I want to know if the work we did produced results. That’s as important for us as it is for our clients.

If we’re not getting results we won’t be in business long. And I’d like a lot of warning and an opportunity to do something about it before that happens.

We offer review meetings as an option for our strategy development and strategy execution services. Even if the client opts not to use us to structure and facilitate those meetings I’ll often ask if I can sit in for part of one and listen.

The article which caused my state of advanced excitement is called “8 Things Great Consultants Say” and it’s written by Jeff Haden.

I think he’s really hit on 8, if not the 8, differentiating factors of really effective consultants.

So what do you think? Want to share some experiences?

If you enjoyed this post you’ll like Why You Need A Consultant With Hands-On Experience

Click here and automatically receive our latest blog posts

Things Really Good Consultants Say

I am so excited!

There’s an absolutely fabulous article on the Inc. magazine web site. Okay, everything they publish is good. But this article is way up there.

The point the author makes is that consultants who get results and deliver a great service say certain things while they are pitching for business. Business owners who listen for them can dramatically reduce their risk when selecting or hiring a consultant.

Why am I excited? Because we say these things all the time – we really do!

Here are my favourites.

1.    “I don’t know.” Why would you say anything else? The client is going to figure out that you don’t know what you’re talking about sooner or later.

And we’re not in business to learn at a client’s expense.

Consultants should only offer services in areas with which they’re intimately familiar (no I won’t use the “expert” word, I dislike it intensely). That’s because they’ve spent a long time acquiring skill and experience in the topic. And they’re still learning and staying up to date in the field.

Our field was originally strategy development and execution. To that we’ve recently added succession planning

2.    “You can do that on your own.” I’m going to meet a client later today and tell him just that. Why? Because he has the expertise to complete some of the project steps in house.

I appreciate it when the people and companies I deal with try to save me money. Why wouldn’t our clients feel the same? And the time that we save by taking this approach we spend looking for things that truly only we can do.

It’s also our policy to bill out at the rate of the person who does the work. So if we use support staff to complete a task, we bill it at their rate, not mine.

Yes I’m a Scotsman but I like to live up to my name as the “canny Scotsman”.

3.    “I still don’t understand the requirements.” I’ll risk appearing slow to understand at the front end of a project to avoid risking missed expectations at the back end.

Despite the number of years I’ve been in business it never ceases to amaze me how quickly and easily misunderstandings occur. One bad assumption about what was meant can lead to great frustration – and damage to our reputation.

So, if there’s any room for misinterpretation it’s better to ask a clarifying question.

4.    “We’ll want to come back later to see how things turned out.” The challenge for our profession is that the consulting assignment could be finishing just as the real work is starting.

Call me nosey but, while some consultants will walk away at the end of the project, I want to know if the work we did produced results. That’s as important for us as it is for our clients.

If we’re not getting results we won’t be in business long. And I’d like a lot of warning and an opportunity to do something about it before that happens.

We offer review meetings as an option for our strategy development and strategy execution services. Even if the client opts not to use us to structure and facilitate those meetings I’ll often ask if I can sit in for part of one and listen.

The article which caused my state of advanced excitement is called “8 Things Great Consultants Say” and it’s written by Jeff Haden.

I think he’s really hit on 8 (if not the 8) differentiating factors of really effective consultants.

So what do you think? Want to share some experiences?

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