Posts Tagged ‘value’

ProfitPATH’s Top Ten Blogs – First Quarter 2015

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

Lessons about successful business growth1.  3 Lessons About Successful Business Growth

Two books, published 19 years apart, yet saying similar things about a key aspect of successful business growth:
‘Built To Last’ was published in 1994. In it, Jim Collins analyzed 18 companies that he called visionary because they were the best in their industries – and had been that way for decades. Collins argued that the core values and enduring purpose of all 18 could be separated from their operating practices and business strategies. And that, while the former never changed, the latter changed constantly in response to a changing world.
In her book ‘The End Of Competitive Advantage’, published in 2013, Rita Gunther McGrath studied the performance of large, publicly-traded companies from 2000-2009. She found that only 10 of them grew their net income by at least 5% every year. All 10 had found ways to combine tremendous internal stability with tremendous external flexibility. McGrath argues that to win in volatile and uncertain times, companies must learn to exploit short-lived opportunities quickly and decisively. more

time for a change in the direction you are heading, focus on center of compass...2.  3 Times When You May Need To Change Your Strategy

Changes to a well thought-out, well-crafted strategy shouldn’t be driven simply because it’s been in place 1, 3 or 5 years. A strategy shouldn’t necessarily be changed even if it isn’t producing results. In this situation I always look at how well (or badly) the strategy is being executed before I look at the strategy itself. So when should a company review its strategy? And what makes that review and any subsequent adaptation, revision or re-creation necessary? Here are three occasions. more

10 Commandments of Business Development3.  10 Commandments of Business Development

I’m not enjoying the after-effects of the 2007/2008 financial crisis. And I’m certainly not a fan of the banks, investment and other, which I believe were a significant contributor to the mess. But, while my wife may disagree, I like to think I keep an open mind. So when I saw an article talking about how Goldman Sachs grew from mid-tier firm to global player in a few decades I had to peek. John Whitehead, a co-head of the firm in 1970, wrote the following 10 commandments that guided their business development efforts. I love them. They’re full of common sense and they’re very practical. Written in 1970, these 10 commandments add to my belief that the basic, common sense principles of business never change. Here are 4 things that business owners today can take from them: more

4.  Adaptive Strategy – A Way To Profits In The New Normal?

Adaptive Strategy is an alternative developed by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG)¹. Here’s how I think it applies to owner managed businesses. Adaptive strategy is built on the 3 R’s required in a changing environment². Can adaptive strategy be applied in owner managed businesses? more

5.  6 Ways A Business Owner Can Influence Culture

I wrote last week about the relationship between Strategy, Culture and Leadership. As a result we’ve had some questions about how a business owner can influence the culture in his/her company. Here, in no particular priority, are 6 ways that it can be done. more

6.  The Difference Between A Strategy And A Plan

I want to talk briefly about what I think is one of the worst mistakes – confusing strategy and planning. Roger Martin wrote a post for the HBR last month in which he dealt with this very topic. I frequently hear business owners talk about the need to do “strategic planning” in order to create a “strategic plan”. Some talk – every year – about holding a “strategic planning meeting”. more

7.  6 Challenges Fast Growing Companies Face

I’ve mentioned Inc. magazine www.inc.com several times before. It’s a great resource. There’s a well-researched article in the current issue about 6 challenges fast growing companies face. They’re all about execution – and if the owner doesn’t deal with them well any one of them can be fatal. more

8.  6 Tips For Growing Your Business in 2015 – How to Use Them

I was asked a good question last week. “Loved your last blog post, Jim – but how do companies like mine do those things?” So here are some ways any business owner can implement the 6 tips in his/her company. more

9.  6 Tips For Growing Your Business in 2015

January is the month for New Year’s resolutions, freezing cold and, for many, a new fiscal year. Everyone wants to ‘do better’ in 2015 than in 2014 and, for business owners, ‘doing better’ is shorthand for growing. I don’t know how often, in the last couple of weeks, I’ve been asked something like “What are your top 6 tips for growing successfully”. The answer depends on a number of things. Here’s the rub. All 6 are much easier to talk about than do. But if you start on them now you can make some progress this year. more

10. 3 Reasons Why Strategy Isn’t Dead In The Water

I hate sweeping generalizations. Strategy is dead is one that I particularly dislike. To say that, it seems to me, is to say that it’s a complete waste of time for every company, regardless of size or industry, to have a strategy.
An article appeared in the Globe and Mail late last year, headline “Why Strategy is Dead In The Water.” It was based on an earlier article in Forbes magazine, headline “Is Strategy Dead? 7 Reasons The Answer May Be Yes.” We’d gone from strategy might be dead to signing its death certificate – in the space of two headlines. more

 

Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

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One Big Reason Why Strategies Fail

Tuesday, September 9th, 2014

the main reason a strategy fails is based in how it’s executedI often argue that a strategy isn’t important.

It’s the benefits a strategy delivers – more profit, increasing the value of a company – that are important. They put more money in the owner’s pocket.

To reap those benefits the strategy must, of course, be successful.

A strategy can fail for many reasons.

It could just be a lousy strategy. But that happens less often than you might think.

Even a poorly conceived strategy can deliver results – if it’s executed with focus, energy and passion.

I believe the main reason a strategy fails is based in how it’s executed.

For example:

  • There’s no link between the strategy and the actions which have to be completed if it’s to be successful.
  • Most people don’t know what the strategy is – and the part their job has to play in making it successful.
  • People, at all levels, do know what their role is – but there’s no accountability if they miss targets.

Some examples are less evident.

One in particular is quite insidious. It goes like this.

After intense discussion, the owner and management team reach a consensus on the strategy for the next 3 years. Everyone goes off determined to do the right things to execute it successfully.

However, since much of their time is taken up with running the business day-to-day, after a while, that begins to affect their perspective.

And that gradual, subtle change in perspective can have a major impact on the execution of their strategy.

It is possible to detect it and fix it. But that requires the discipline to do 2 things.

First, hold regular strategy review meetings. Second, keep the agenda off day-to-day stuff, and on measuring progress toward the 3-year goal.

Any shift in perspective can be spotted by asking one question. “Are all of the projects being discussed integrated/aligned with the strategy we chose for the next 3 years?”

The odds are there will be some drift.

That’s because the company is made up of people. And people tend to have their own priorities, concerns, agenda, and goals – which may be directly opposed to the next person’s. In the face of day-to-day pressures, people find it hard to keep the whole company perspective in mind.

But it can be restored – and one big reason why execution fails can be easily avoided.

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Strategy Execution – How You Do What You Do

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Jim StewartJim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Strategy And The Sales Force

Tuesday, August 26th, 2014

“It’s as plain as the nose on your face!”Funny glasses

One of my aunts used to say that when one of us kids overlooked something by not looking at a situation in a complete way. We saw the obvious – but missed the subtle message.

I was reminded of that yesterday.

I was reading about how, in the mid-1990s, Xerox missed an underlying technological change taking place in their industry.

The sales force was focused on maintaining market share in the face of lower cost competitors like Canon.

But, even though they were visiting companies every day, they missed the fact that people were beginning to use PCs and printers to produce copies.

How did this happen? How could something, so evident in retrospect, have been missed?

One answer is that sales and strategy are separate worlds, often disconnected from each other.

No doubt that’s true. But it’s not just a process or functional issue.

Before becoming a CEO, I spent time in sales and then managed sales forces.

I also worked in companies which had entrenched positions in their industries and which failed to respond to structural shifts.

So here’s my question. Even if the sale force had spotted the change, would anyone have listened to them?

Market dominance can breed a culture in which owners and management develop the belief that they can do no wrong. Their attitude is…….

We’re doing what we’ve always done and that’s resulted in success for many years now. If growth slows or sales actually decrease, that must be because the sales force have stopped being effective.

Instead of complaining about products not having enough features or prices being too high, the sales people need to focus on making calls. What’s needed is a sales training program. And if that doesn’t work, then we’ll replace a few of them.

If things still don’t turn around, we’ll have a look at our marketing programs.

By which they really mean the promotional programs, if any, because they’ve forgotten that marketing also includes pricing and product strategies.

I was on the receiving end of attitudes like these when I worked in corporations.

And, in the last 13 years, we’ve worked with many privately owned companies after sales training and marketing programs failed to restart growth.

So, before reaching for the process or functional solutions, take a moment to check the culture and attitudes. However improbable, that might lead to the answer.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Is Crushing the Competition a Strategy?

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Jim StewartJim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Is “Crushing The Competition” A Strategy?

Tuesday, July 22nd, 2014

Saying you’re going to crush the competition may provide the emotional fire to drive a sales team to beat its short-term revenue targets.It is possible to win without crushing the competition.

But as a strategy for the whole business, it’s not only ineffective, it’s dangerous.

Here’s why.

1.  It puts the focus in the wrong place.

A successful strategy focuses on customer needs; the value proposition with which the company satisfies those needs; and the resources and capabilities required to deliver it.

Trying to crush the competition puts the focus on doing things “better” than they do.

It puts competitors, not customers, front and centre. It substitutes action based on original thinking, with reaction to someone else’s thinking.

2.  It sacrifices the long term for the short term.

Two common tactics for crushing the competition are providing more features for the same price and cutting prices.

However neither of them creates new value for customers, nor do they help the company’s long-term margins.

Businesses reap the biggest rewards when their strategies provide previously unrealized value for consumers and users by, for example, introducing new, or enhanced, products or services.

That, however, takes time and the willingness to take risk. It may also open up new parts of the market for everyone.

The iPhone, for example, didn’t just help Apple, it broadened the market for mobile devices. Fracking not only breathed new life into the U.S. oil and gas industry, it benefitted suppliers to the industry.

3.  Business isn’t like war.

Originally, strategy had its application in winning battles and wars. And the only way to win is to beat the other side; the more crushing the defeat inflicted on the loser, the better.

But in business, it is possible to win without crushing the competition.

How? By finding an untapped opportunity. For example, Starbucks redefined the coffee drinking experience and Jet Blue redefined discount travel.

In order to do that, both had to understand their competitors’ value propositions – a more productive, more effective, even healthier, way to deal with competitors.

I’m not suggesting that competitors can be ignored – but they have to be kept in context.

4.  Emotion replaces logic.

Finally, when leaders go to war with their competitors, emotion often overwhelms business logic. If it can happen to Steve Jobs – remember the repercussions from iMaps – it can happen to anyone.

In case you’re curious about what set me off on this particular rant, it was a post by Ken Favaro, one of my favourite writers on strategy.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Putting The Horse Before The Cart – That’s Strategy!

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

ProfitPATH’s Top Ten Blogs – First Half 2014

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

 

1.   6 Challenges Fast Growing Companies Face

I’ve mentioned Inc. magazine www.inc.com several times before. It’s a great resource. There’s a well-researched article in the current issue about 6 challenges fast growing companies face. They’re all about execution – and if the owner doesn’t deal with them well any one of them can be fatal. more

 

 

Strategy is not planning and the importance of knowing the difference2.   The Difference Between A Strategy And A Plan

I want to talk briefly about what I think is one of the worst mistakes – confusing strategy and planning. Roger Martin wrote a post for the HBR last month in which he dealt with this very topic. I frequently hear business owners talk about the need to do “strategic planning” in order to create a “strategic plan”. Some talk – every year – about holding a “strategic planning meeting”. more

 

3time for a change in the direction you are heading, focus on center of compass....   3 Times When You May Need To Change Your Strategy

Changes to a well thought-out, well-crafted strategy shouldn’t be driven simply because it’s been in place 1, 3 or 5 years. A strategy shouldn’t necessarily be changed even if it isn’t producing results. In this situation I always look at how well (or badly) the strategy is being executed before I look at the strategy itself. So when should a company review its strategy? And what makes that review and any subsequent adaptation, revision or recreation necessary? Here are three occasions. more

4.   Adaptive Strategy – A Way To Profits In The New Normal?

Adaptive Strategy is an alternative developed by The Boston Consulting Group (BCG)1. Here’s how I think it applies to owner managed businesses. Adaptive strategy is built on the 3 R’s required in a changing environment2. Can adaptive strategy be applied in owner managed businesses? more

5.   6 Ways A Business Owner Can Influence Culture

I wrote last week about the relationship between Strategy, Culture and Leadership. As a result we’ve had some questions about how a business owner can influence the culture in his/her company. Here, in no particular priority, are 6 ways that it can be done. more

6.   6 Things We Can All Learn From Family-Owned Businesses

The 6 things I’m going to talk about come from a study of 149 large, publicly-traded, family-controlled businesses. However, stay with me because we’ve seen the same characteristics in the successful family-owned businesses we’ve dealt with – and none of them are publicly traded. Another thing – the study looked at 1997 – 2009, covering some good and some very tough times. Guess what? The family-controlled businesses, on average, turned in better long-term financial performance than non-family businesses – in multiple countries. So what are the 6 things we can learn? more

7.   6 Tips For Finding The Right Buyer

Last week I was one of three speakers at the Toronto Star’s Small Business Club event, “Exit and Succession Planning”. My talk included 6 things a business owner can do to ensure she/he finds the right buyer or successor. more

8.   3 Ways Human Nature Sabotages Strategy

Ask 10 people how long it will take them to complete a task and I’d guess 7 or 8 of them will underestimate the time required. That proportion might increase if the 10 are all type A personalities – i.e. business owners or entrepreneurs. We see this when we take teams through our strategy and business planning processes. For example, at a specific point, we prioritize the things they need to do to close the gap between their company’s current state and where they want it in 3 years’ time. Typically the teams want to tackle more items than is humanly possible given their resources. There’s no ideal number of items – the complexity of each item is only 1 of the variables – but we’ve seen time and again that completing a few key tasks produces better results than taking on too many. more

9.   5 Traits Effective Business Owners Share

I believe the single biggest thing that separates companies that grow from those that don’t is the owner’s awareness of the need for change and their willingness to do so. So, I was interested in a recent post about traits that effective entrepreneurs share. Sure enough, it contained a quote saying that if owners commit to learning more about themselves and becoming the best that they can be, they’ll find that challenges are really opportunities. But what other traits, according to the post, do effective entrepreneurs have? more

10.  Strategic Planning – 3 Things That Are Wrong With It

We all know that picking a strategy means making choices. But that means making guesses about that great unknown, the future. What happens then if we make the wrong choice? Could we destroy a company? That’s why, according to Roger Martin¹, we turn choosing a strategy into a problem that can be solved using tools we are comfortable with. And we call that strategic planning. But, Martin says, companies make 3 mistakes when they confuse strategy and strategic planning. more

 

 

Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Strategy, Capabilities – and The Beatles

Tuesday, February 11th, 2014

It’s 50 years since the Beatles first appeared on the Ed Sullivan show and took the USA by storm.What it takes to develop a dynamic capability

At that time I was 12 years old, living in Scotland and proud of my collection of Beatles songs, all of which were recorded on the EMI label.

Now EMI was an interesting company. For example, during World War 2, they built the first airborne radar.

And in 1971 one of EMI’s engineers introduced the first commercial CT scanner. However, like many other companies, it never profited from its invention.

Why? EMI knew the market of CT scanners lay in the US, but it didn’t have manufacturing capabilities there. In the time it took to build a plant, GE and Siemens had reverse-engineered the CT scanner – and the rest is history.

This is a classic example of a company having a good strategy, but not the capabilities to exploit it.

Clearly, capabilities are crucial to success. But what are they and why are they so important?

David Teece¹  defines a capability as “a set of learned processes and activities that enable a company to produce a particular outcome”.

Ordinary capabilities are like best practices. They start in 1 or 2 companies but spread throughout an industry.

Dynamic capabilities are, on the other hand, unique to each company. They’re based on things a company has done successfully in its past and captured in business models developed over many years. As a result they’re difficult to imitate.

A business owner must do 3 things to make a capability dynamic.

First, identify and evaluate opportunities in the market. Then quickly mobilize the company’s resources to capture the value in those opportunities. Finally create an environment of continuous renewal.

Why are dynamic capabilities crucial?

EMI discovered the hard way that spotting an opportunity isn’t enough. The resources must be in place to quickly take advantage of the opportunity.

And Nokia is an example of what can happen when even market leaders aren’t in continuous renewal. Teece believes they missed the smartphone revolution because they relied on R&D which took place in Finland. Apple, based in San Francisco, was much more in touch with North American consumers’ wants and emerging technologies.

Developing dynamic capabilities could be a way to survive in a world where change is taking place more quickly than ever before.

______________________________________
¹ “The Dynamic Capabilities of David Teece”, Strategy + Business, 11 Nov 13
http://www.strategy-business.com/article/00225?pg=all&tid=27782251

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy 5 Tips for Fast Growth in a Slow Economy

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Jim Stewart is the founding Partner at ProfitPATH. He has been working with business owners for over 16 years to increase profits and improve the value of their companies. LinkedIn

Is Strategy Static or Variable?

Tuesday, January 28th, 2014

This week’s guest is Dick Albu, the founder and president of Albu Consulting, a strategy management consulting firm focused on engaging and energizing leadership teams of middle market private and family business to formulate robust business strategies and follow through on execution of key strategic initiatives.

 

 

In last month’s issue of AlbuonStrategy we discussed three reasons why strategy fails (3 Reasons Strategy Fails).  I would like to follow up on that conversation with a question—is strategy static or variable?  From our own client experience, we believe there is both confusion and difference of opinion about the answer to this question.

Would you agree that strategy is a dynamic, continuous and adaptive process and it needs to be managed over the long term?   Let’s be honest, as sound as you might feel your strategy is today, you should never stop questioning it.  Strategy is simply a bet on the perceived future.  No one has yet found a way to predict all that will happen in the future. Rather, we accept a forecast of the future based on our current knowledge and past experiences for our business and industry.

Think about the surprises you have encountered in your business:  Technology changes, departure of key employees, competitors gaining advantages, loss of a major customer, etc., etc.  These are just a few examples of disruptions that might cause a change of course at any point during the implementation of your strategy.   In our experience, we have seen how effective this “variable” mindset can be.  The bottom line is if you accept and operate under the concept that strategy is dynamic, continuous and adaptive, you will develop a heightened awareness of internal or external changes that might impact your strategy and be better prepared to deal with these challenges in a deliberate manner.

So are all elements of your strategy variable?  No.  While your strategy needs to be dynamic, continuous and adaptive, the strategy’s foundation should be static.  The strategy’s foundation defines the way you play and win in the market. Think of it as the way you create value for your business and the capabilities that support your advantages.  Not to say that the strategy’s foundation cannot change, because it can, but it usually takes a commitment of time and resources over the long term.  This is why a client of ours decided to limit the product categories they participate in, or another international business restricted itself to operate in only a few select countries.

What are the differentiating capabilities that support your strategy’s foundation?  How do these capabilities define what business you are in and how you do business with your customers?   If you are clear about what comprises your strengths and capabilities, you will make better strategic decisions more often and with more confidence.

Your strategy needs to be variable to deal realistically with the unpredictable and stay relevant in the fast changing business world we live in.  At the same time, the foundation of your strategy needs to remain constant so that short term strategic decisions build off your value proposition and differentiating capabilities.  Are you prepared to manage this paradox?

Dick can be reached at 203-321-2147 or RAlbu@albuconsulting.com. For more information on Albu Consulting visit www.albuconsulting.com.

Top Ten In 2013……

Tuesday, January 7th, 2014

The votes (page views) have been counted; the results can be announced!

Our top 10 blog posts in 2013 were:

1.   6 Challenges Fast Growing Companies Face, which won by a good margin, discusses the 6 challenges of execution which, if not dealt with, could prove fatal.

2.   10 Tips To Improve Your Public Speaking Body Language, written by Mark Bowden of TruthPlane, is the first of our guest posts to make the list.

3.   The Difference Between A Strategy And A Plan talks about the difference between strategy and planning and why it’s important to understand what these terms mean.

4.   6 Ways A Business Owner Can Influence Culture looks at the ways a business owner can develop a culture which will help increase operating profits and build shareholder value.

5.   Adaptive Strategy – A Way To Profits In The New Normal? looks at an alternative strategy that is built on the 3 R’s (Responsiveness, Resilience, Readiness) required in a changing environment.

6.   3 Times When You May Need To Change Your Strategy explains when a company should review its strategy and what makes that review and any subsequent actions necessary.

7.   6 Things We Can All Learn From Family-Owned Business puts forward 6 simple things business owners can implement to achieve better long-term financial performances.

8.   Strategy, Culture and Leadership deals with how these 3 things affect the development and the execution of strategy.

9.   10 Commandments of Business Development are the basic, common sense principles every business owner can apply to their business development efforts.

10.  How To Keep Control When You Work With Consultants provides steps business owners can take to maintain control when they work with consultants.

If you haven’t seen them before, here’s your opportunity!

Should The Business Owner Remain CEO?

Tuesday, July 2nd, 2013

From time to time a business owner we’re working with will ask if we think he or she is the right person to take their company to the next level.Should business owners remain in or relinquish the position of CEO?

This concern has its roots in a broader question.

Can entrepreneurs scale the companies they start or should a professional manager/CEO be brought in at some point?

Arguably this is a leadership not a strategy issue. But the two are interwoven, perhaps even inseparable.

Randy Ottinger nicely summarized the alternative approaches in a recent article.

1.  The founder stays on as CEO

This theory, like the others, is supported by research from very credible sources.

The conclusion – founding CEOs consistently outperform professional CEOs on a broad range of business and financial measures. The founders of technology companies, in particular, have core competencies an outsider may not have.

Some high profile companies with successful founder CEOs are Starbucks, Amazon and Apple.

2.  The founder forms a partnership (not necessarily in the legal sense) with a professional CEO

This time, the research concludes that founders maximize the value of their equity by giving up the CEO position.

The founder of LinkedIn supports this alternative. He argues that retaining the founder prevents the loss of the essence and entrepreneurial nature of the company, while at the same time gaining the expertise to scale the company in the professional CEO.

Other companies, which went this route, were eBay and Google.

3.  The founder is replaced by a professional CEO (brought in from another company)

The third alternative is to replace the founder with an outsider.

But Jim Collins, amongst others, concludes that great companies have a much greater chance of success if they hire from within rather than go outside to find a CEO.

So where does all of this leave us?

4.  The fourth alternative – common sense at work?

Clearly, not all situations are the same.

So, perhaps it’s not about choosing either a founder/CEO or professional/ CEO, but about using the leader whose skills and abilities best match the requirements of the task at hand.

Founders typically are innovators with entrepreneurial drive who may not have the skills needed to execute. Professional managers typically know how to execute or scale but are not strong on innovation.

The question, in both cases, is does the individual have at least some of the missing skills and the desire to build on/improve it? (Which ties to one of my theories.)

If the answer is “no” then a “team” approach may be more effective. Titles can always be massaged (e.g. 1 person is President, the other CEO; 1 is CEO, the other COO).

But the job responsibilities must be clear and unambiguous.

You can read Randy Ottinger’s article here.

 

If you enjoyed this post you’ll also enjoy Don’t Shoot Your Strategy In The Foot.

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Putting The Horse Before The Cart – That’s Strategy!

Tuesday, April 16th, 2013

According to Ken Favaro¹,  we often confuse “some version of a vision, a mission, a purpose, a plan, or a set of goals for a strategy”.Develop a strategy first, then execute it

Why is that important?

While these 5 things (he calls them the ‘corporate 5’) play a part in the execution of a strategy they “do not give you” a strategy.

Surprised?

To quote Favaro, “If the corporate five are the cart and strategy is the horse, leaders who put the cart first often end up with no horse at all.”

Or in my words – you’ll get better results (higher profits, a better valuation) if you first develop a strategy and then execute it – not the other way around.

In the interest of full disclosure Favaro said that corporate executives are guilty of this type of confusion.

But, guess what, in our experience the owners of family businesses and privately-owned companies are just as guilty and do exactly the same thing.

Favaro says there are 5 more fundamental questions (the ‘strategic 5’) that have to be answered before worrying about visions, plans and goals:

• What business should we be in?
• How do we add value to our business?
• Who are the target customers?
• What is our value proposition for those target customers?
• What capabilities are essential for adding value and achieving differentiation?

There’s a reason this is way more than just interesting.

Roger Martin talks about² strategy being “an integrated set of 5 choices” which are made by answering 5 questions:

• What’s our winning aspiration (or the purpose of the business)?
• Where will we play (which cities/provinces/countries, for which end users)?
• How will we win (what is our value proposition or competitive advantage)?
• What capabilities must be in place?
• What management systems are required?

See any similarities?

Martin and Lafley also talk about what strategy isn’t. They say that many leaders (thus including entrepreneurs/business owners) approach strategy in ineffective ways, for example they define strategy as a vision or as a plan.

Again, see the similarities?

Yes, I am back on the topic of the many and incredible ways in which the word strategy has been, and still is, misused. And I love it when people agree with me. Particularly when their reputation (or at least their profile) is bigger than mine.

But why should anyone who makes a living in the real world care?

Because more business owners will make better profits and add more value to their companies if they get better at executing their strategy.

And the first step is to be clear about what strategy is.

                                                                        

¹ “How Leaders Mistake Execution for Strategy (and Why That Damages Both)”, Strategy + Business, 11 February 2013
² “Playing To Win”, A. G. Lafley and Roger L. Martin, Harvard Business Review Press, 2013, pages 3 – 15

 

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